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Taiwan scholar predicts clearer cross-strait policies from political parties

Chao Chun-shan says Jaw Shaw-kong's clear policy will force other candidates to define theirs

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Hou Yu-ih (center left) and Jaw Shaw-kong (center right) wave to reporters Sunday. (CNA photo)

Hou Yu-ih (center left) and Jaw Shaw-kong (center right) wave to reporters Sunday. (CNA photo)

TAIPEI (Taiwan News) — A Taiwanese scholar of China studies said the Kuomintang’s (KMT) vice presidential candidate, Jaw Shaw-Kong (趙少康), will make his own and other parties' cross-strait policies clearer.

Speaking to CNA on Sunday, Chao Chun-shan (趙春山) of Tamkang University said that Jaw will help KMT presidential candidate Hou Yu-ih (侯友宜) clarify his stance on cross-strait relations. He said that Jaw’s stance is clearer than Hou’s, and this will help the KMT ticket’s election chances.

Chao said that the KMT is clearly opposed to Taiwan independence, but said Hou’s stance on the issue and the 1992 consensus is less clear than what former President Ma Ying-jeou (馬英九) presented during his administration. In contrast, Jaw’s stance is very clear, and this will help gain the support of “deep blue” KMT voters, Chao said, referring to ardent supporters of the party.

Chao said the effect of Jaw’s clear stance on cross-strait relations will encourage other political parties to also make their viewpoints clear. He said he believes cross-strait issues will be the point that distinguishes Taiwan’s three major political parties in the election.

Taiwan scholar predicts clearer cross-strait policies from political parties
Chao Chun-shan is pictured in 2014. (Voice of America photo)

Tai Sounds reported that when asked about his cross-strait policy on Sunday, he pointed to the Ma presidency. “When looking at the eight years of Ma Ying-jeou and the eight years of Tsai Ing-wen (蔡英文), the former maintained peace in the Taiwan Strait, gained Taiwan visa free access to more than 100 countries, and saw Taiwan serve as an observer at the World Health Assembly,” Jaw said.

“The Democratic Progressive Party has been in power eight years and (Taiwan) has not been able to participate in any international organizations,” Jaw said. “It has already lost nine formal diplomatic allies,” he added.

Ma’s presidency was characterized by a clear anti-independence stance on the basis that independence would lead to war. In a 2006 interview, Ma said he sought to maintain the status quo, which he said was “no unification, no independence, no use of force.”