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Wet weather expected over Taiwan's Double Ten holiday

Lingering clouds associated with passing of Typhoon Koinu lead to heavy rainfall

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A pedestrian walks in the rain in Taipei. (CNA photo)

A pedestrian walks in the rain in Taipei. (CNA photo)

TAIPEI (Taiwan News) — The four-day Double Ten holiday will be be marred by wet weather, putting a damper on many scheduled outdoor activities to run Oct. 7–11, per UDN.

WeatherRisk CEO and meteorologist Peng Chi-ming (彭啟明) said rain and moisture are associated with Typhoon Koinu's lingering cloud formation. Peng expects strengthening northeasterly monsoon winds could lead to even more rainfall in northeast Taiwan.

The Central Weather Administration (CWA) issued a heavy rain advisory warning for Taipei, New Taipei, Yilan, and Keelung for Monday (Oct. 9). For central and southern parts of Taiwan, a convective weather system will bring rain in mountainous areas in the evening.

WeatherRisk meteorologist Ke Yu-ning (柯聿寧) said the weather front will move eastward Monday morning (Oct. 9), with rainfall intensity temporarily slowing, though rain is expected to persist in northeastern Taiwan. Temperatures in inland areas will likely reach over 30 C in the daytime.

Ke expects rain for Double Ten Day, with a chance of heavy rainfall in northeastern areas. The wind direction will turn northerly on Wednesday (Oct. 11), with rainfall moving southward to the Hualien and Taitung areas. Motorists are advised to pay attention to wet road conditions when passing through Yilan, Hualien, and other coastal areas.

Rainfall will begin to decrease from Thursday to Friday (Oct. 12–13), with northeasterly monsoon winds beginning to weaken. A radiative cooling effect will also become more obvious as temperature differences between day and night become more distinct. Temperatures could drop to between 22 and 24 C.

As for Tropical Storm Bolaven, currently located southeast of Guam, it is expected to move in a northeasterly direction, heading towards Japan, with little to no impact on Taiwan.