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After record, Bonds moves on to next step: number 757

After record, Bonds moves on to next step: number 757

Barry Bonds was back doing what he knows best Wednesday, hitting a home run in his first at-bat as the world was left to debate the merits of his career home run record set a day earlier.
From the White House, to international home run king Sadaharu Oh in Japan, to his first major league manager, Jim Leyland, and onto Alex Rodriguez, the congratulations began to pour in for the San Francisco star, who realized in recent weeks just how difficult it is to clear the fences when that's all you're trying to do.
"Now, the hard part's over, and we get to actually go back to our everyday routines and enjoy ourselves," Bonds said.
Not that he didn't enjoy the celebration after hitting his 756th homer Tuesday to break Hank Aaron's 33-year-old record.
But Bonds took a glimpse toward the future Wednesday: Yes, he does believe A-Rod will eventually unseat him atop the home run chart.
The New York Yankees third baseman reached 500 at age 32, far ahead of Bonds' pace.
"I'm not trying to set any bars. Alex will break my record," Bonds said, standing at his locker pre-game. "He's young enough to catch anybody. Like I said I'm rooting for him. He got through one. Each one gets a little bit tougher."
It took him a while to wind down from all the excitement surrounding this feat. His wife, Liz, sported a black T-shirt reading "The King and I" on the front. And Bonds had his two daughters, Shikari and Aisha, son Nikolai, his mother, Pat, and a sister to celebrate the moment.
Not to mention Hall of Fame godfather, Willie Mays, his agent, two of his trainers, a pair of publicists and many other friends thrilled to be part of it.
"I'm just tickled to death for him," Leyland said. "What I feel is different than anyone else might feel. I have a personal relationship with him. I was his first manager and I raised him."
Bonds' received a call from President Bush on Wednesday morning.
"He said congratulations. He said it was great to have my kids there, my family there," Bonds recalled of the conversation. "With his father being famous as well, he understood the importance of my father. He said it was an outstanding achievement."
Bonds' solo shot over the wall in right-center gave his hometown fans yet another reason to cheer and celebrate him and forget _ for this night at least _ the suspicions that steroids fueled his pursuit of the Hammer.
"This record is not tainted at all. At all. Period," Bonds said Tuesday.
Next up for the 43-year-old Bonds? He hopes it's reaching 3,000 hits, and he plans to play in 2008 and beyond, as long as his body allows it.
He has 2,915 hits now.
"I haven't gotten there yet, but I want it," Bonds said of 3,000.
Bonds' milestone came on the fifth anniversary of players agreeing to drug testing.
A grand jury is investigating whether Bonds perjured himself when he testified in the BALCO case that he hadn't knowingly taken performance-enhancing drugs.
Someone asked whether the grand jury had come up in his conversation with the President.
"Are you serious? Are you dead serious? It never ends," Bonds said.
When Bonds arrived at the stadium, he was making his way through the hallway from the players' parking lot to the clubhouse when a female ballpark worker saw him.
"You did it!" she said, and Bonds smiled and acknowledged her.
The record has meant so much to everybody, especially those with a front-row seat to witness history _ like Bonds' teammates.
"We're all cherishing this moment," Mark Sweeney said. "We're all happy for him and to be a part of it. It was a special night for San Francisco.
"All I can say from the 24 guys in this locker room, it's moment we'll remember. It's part of baseball history."
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AP Sports Writer Larry Lage in Detroit contributed to this story.


Updated : 2021-10-20 03:38 GMT+08:00