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Flooding rivers kill six, displace thousands in Sudan

Flooding rivers kill six, displace thousands in Sudan

Massive floods have killed at least six people and displaced over ten thousand in southern Sudan over the past few days, government officials said Monday as they raised the alert level ahead of more expected torrential rainfall.
The unusually strong seasonal rains in most of the country have killed at least 41 people so far and destroyed thousands of homes. United Nations agencies and international aid groups say they are dispatching large quantities of aid, including food, medicine and mosquito nets to prevent Malaria, to endangered populations.
The rains are reaching record levels and have caused mudslides that destroyed the homes of over 10,000 families on the outskirts of the capital, Khartoum, where the White and Blue Niles meet to form Africa's largest river.
High waves wiped six people off the banks of the Blue Nile in the town of Damazin in the border zone between northern and southern Sudan, officials also said Monday.
In Renk, a town on the White Nile in southern Sudan, floods "totally destroyed 1,518 huts and killed at least 600 cattle, affecting some 4,729 families, including 2027 children" said Deng Chul Deng, the acting commissioner for the province.
He said there were also 23 cases of watery diarrhea, a life threatening disease for children that is caused by poor hygiene conditions. "But the situation is contained for now," Deng was quoted as saying by the official SUNA news agency.
SUNA and other media reported whole villages had been wiped away by the rising waters in southern Sudan, and flood refugees in various regions across the country have been calling for help on national radio.
Floods are expected to further hit the capital as waters flow in from the south.
Over 10,000 houses collapsed because of mudslides caused by the floods in the Sharq al Nil neighborhood, south east of downtown Khartoum, said Abdul Jaba Hussein the head of the anti-flooding commission in the capital. He said Monday that 13 people had died in the capital alone since the rains began.
Khartoum lies in near-desertic northern Sudan, but authorities began spraying insecticides in the capital on Monday to avert the risk of epidemic diseases carried by mosquitoes and flies that come with the floods.
The price of products such as mosquito nets has more than doubled in Khartoum in recent days as residents fear a malaria outbreak, and people in neighborhood close to the Nile have stacked sacks of sand along the embankments.


Updated : 2021-10-20 11:33 GMT+08:00