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Research firm warns organizations against 'blind' adoption of SOA frameworks

Research firm warns organizations against 'blind' adoption of SOA frameworks

A recent end-user poll on service-oriented architecture indicates positive development in the region where IT and business users have been aligning their business processes to fulfill project objectives at the early stages of the project, a market research company said in its latest report.
"Some early adopters have deployed small IT groups into business units to align business understanding and to identify key business performance values and services critical to the organizations," IDC said in its study.
"IDC advises early adopters to have a firm control in project portfolio and IT asset assessment. Only 26.5 percent of respondents have been actively assessing reusable processes and services within their organizations."
The market intelligence firm said it is advocating those assessment processes to be formalized early in the SOA project cycle for success.
Some early adopters are trying to imitate the SOA success of their counterparts by "forcing" services and processes that may not be the best fit for their environment, IDC noted.
"An example is where a country, that has a different set of geographic characteristics and at a different stage of technological maturity, attempts to adopt another country's successful SOA framework in e-government services," the research house said.
"Majority of the early SOA adopters have also cited the re-engineering of existing business processes as their top SOA implementation challenge."
According to IDC, the ideal approach necessitates a "re-look" at existing business processes because without proper knowledge and awareness of existing services and processes, the execution process of the SOA project could be difficult.
IDC said it is advising end-user organizations considering SOA adoption to develop a closer collaborative approach with partners and trusted vendors to be equipped with the essential skill sets, roadmaps and implementation methodologies.
End users should ensure that strategic business objectives are met by their SOA implementation roadmaps and these new services are enabling blocks for their organizational needs, it added.
Another trend that IDC has observed is end users continuing with their "in-house" approach to build SOA knowledge and awareness within their organizations.
"Despite the fact that software vendors are offering converged solutions and offerings for better adoption of SOA technology, end users may not necessarily be leveraging the maximum benefits if they do not have a holistic approach to reuse these services," the market research firm said.
Meanwhile, another market research firm, Gartner Inc., said SOA will be used in more than 50 percent of new mission-critical operational applications and business processes designed in 2007 and in more than 80 percent by 2010.
SOA has dramatically grown in popularity, and adoption has expanded across vertical industries, geographies and organization sizes. However, the number of failed projects has also grown, it added. Organizations have discovered that SOA benefits have a cost and the challenges associated with its adoption have become more apparent, said the Gartner report.
"New software products for SOA have hit the market, but given their immaturity, have disappointed users in terms of reliability, performance and productivity," said L. Frank Kenney, a research director for Gartner.
"SOA principles have been applied too rigidly, and this has led to unsatisfactory outcomes as projects became too costly and didn't meet deadlines."
This is not bad news however, Kenney said, noting that organizations are using this approach and adopting the relevant enabling technologies.
"Large numbers of successes have been reported, and no major conceptual flaw has been discovered in SOA. Organizations should aggressively invest in SOA as it will rapidly become the architectural foundation for virtually every new business-critical application," Kenney said.
Moving to an SOA is, in most cases, motivated by significant changes in the business environment. This need most frequently manifests itself in the context of a specific business unit, but often also at the corporate level, he continued.
"SOA adoption is greatly beneficial from the (chief information officer's) point of view. To keep pace with relentless business change, IT departments are constantly under pressure to deliver more in a flat-budget situation," said Kenney.


Updated : 2021-06-25 18:38 GMT+08:00