Alexa

In Brief

In Brief

British officials blush over 'monlmenf'
HONG KONG
Red-faced British officials in Hong Kong were trying to find stone masons yesterday after crude repairs to crumbling colonial-era war graves left the stones with howling spelling errors.
The restoration work was so bad that instead of reading "This monument is erected (to) the admiral, captain, officers and crew," one memorial says: "This monlmenf is ebbcted (to) the admiral captain ocficers and grew."
On another, the word China has been mis-spelt "Cihna" and on yet another even Hong Kong is rendered as "Honc Honc," according to a report in the South China Morning Post newspaper.
The errors occur on a large number of graves in the old military cemetery in Happy Valley. Some of the affected stones date back to the Opium Wars between Britain and China in the mid-19th century.
Fugitive sworn in
HONIARA, Solomon Islands
A lawyer fleeing Australian child sex allegations will be sworn in as the Solomon Islands attorney-general next week, the Solomons government said yesterday.
The decision to swear in Julian Moti is likely to reopen a long-running rift with Australia, which tried to extradite Moti - an Australian citizen - from Papua New Guinea in October last year on child sex charges.
Moti evaded extradition proceedings when he was flown from Papua New Guinea to the Solomon Islands on a secret PNG military flight in defiance of Canberra's wishes.
Casinos approved
PORT MORESBY, Papau New Guinea
The South Pacific nation of Papua New Guinea, long reliant on natural resources such as copper, has passed a gaming law to allow casinos and online gambling in the hope it will fuel the economy.
The gaming law, passed by parliament on Tuesday, will allow each of the country's 20 provinces to hold a casino license for 10 years.
The law will also allow overseas-based lottery products and internet gambling.
Casino operators will be required to pay a duty of 20 percent of gross profit and a community benefit gaming levy of 5 percent of gross profit.
Pakistan rally
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan
Pakistani lawyers and opposition workers chanting slogans against Pakistan President Pervez Musharraf rallied yesterday as the country's suspended chief justice appeared before a judicial council.
Justice Iftikhar Mohammad Chaudhry, charged with misconduct and abuse of authority by the president on March 9 made his seventh appearance at the Supreme Court in the capital, his lawyers said.
The rally came despite a heavy crackdown overnight by police who detained hundreds of activists from opposition parties to prevent them from reaching the top court, police and opposition sources said.
Scores of protesters stood under scorching sun shouting "Go Musharraf go," "Musharraf is U.S. stooge" and "We want independent judiciary," witnesses said.
The turnout was much lower than previous protests since the start of the judicial crisis, during which rallies of thousands were held outside the court for each hearing of Chaudhry's case, which is being heard by a panel of judges called the Supreme Judicial Council.