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`Sopranos' Finale Counted Down on Web

`Sopranos' Finale Counted Down on Web

As the final season of the "The Sopranos" counts down, fans of the HBO drama are abuzz online about their last glimpses of the New Jersey mafia family and theories on the show's upcoming finale.
"The Sopranos," created by David Chase, has only five episodes left of its short nine-episode swan song (or should we say duck song?). Speculation has been building on what might be the fate of mob boss Tony Soprano (James Gandolfini).
Everyone has, as Paulie Walnuts might say, an "idear."
http://www.nj.com/sopranos
Slate.com has long published an episode-by-episode review and discussion of "The Sopranos." After Sunday's show, Jeffrey Goldberg, the Washington correspondent for The New Yorker, wrote in a column exchange with Slate's Timothy Noah that "The Sopranos" final season is dawdling.
The fourth episode's lack of narrative urgency, Goldberg wrote, "seemed pointless given that this 86-hour story arc has only five hours to go. Let's start murdering off the cast already, for goodness sake."
Many of the "Sopranos" fan sites are now dormant, which reflects not only the nature of fan sites _ which generally come and go _ but perhaps also a slight waning of enthusiasm for the program. The premiere of this final season of "The Sopranos" drew 7.7 million viewers, down from last year's 9.4 million viewers.
Still, there are whacking odds posted by online bookies. Just before this season's first episode, BetUS.com posted 2-1 odds that Tony will die in the final episodes; Tony living was listed as 1-3.
It's not hard to find amateur finale forecasts, among them that Tony will spill his guts not by a bullet, but by talking to the Feds. Many think Christopher Moltisanti (Michael Imperioli) is doomed after his unflattering fictionalization of Tony in his movie, "Cleaver."
http://www.hbo.com/sopranos
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VIDEO OF THE WEEK: New Yorker Cartoons
The New Yorker magazine recently revamped its Web site. It's now an impressive, artfully presented online destination that publishes more of the magazine's copy than you would expect. It also uses video and audio to accompany stories _ which feels like a technological leap for a magazine that hardly uses photographs. Alec Wilkinson's article on the urban art of parkour, for example, is greatly enhanced by posted video. For many, though, the most appealing bait of NewYorker.com is the magazine's trademark cartoons, which here are animated videos. Still, Elaine from "Seinfeld" might ask: "But are they funny?"
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DOWNLOAD THIS: Sonic Cinema
http://power.listentoamovie.com/
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EDITOR'S NOTE _ What's your favorite Web site? E-mail AP Entertainment Writer Jake Coyle at fcoyle(at)ap.org


Updated : 2021-05-16 13:53 GMT+08:00