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Local official says leaving Taiwan on watch list 'unfair'

Local official says leaving Taiwan on watch list 'unfair'

Taiwan remains on the 2007 Special 301 report watch list, which was released by the Office of the United States Trade Representative on April 30.
Tsai Lien-sheng, director-general of the Intellectual Property Office under the Ministry of Economic Affairs, expressed his disappointment with the findings. He said that it was unfair that despite the fact that the U.S. appreciated efforts made by the Taiwan government to protect intellectual property rights, Taiwan was not removed from the watch list.
Tsai said the government will voice its dissatisfaction to the American Institute in Taiwan.
He said that the unfair results of the report should not be taken too seriously. Tsai added that the government protects intellectual property rights more for the sake of national interests and long-term development, rather than to earn good marks on any U.S. watch list.
The U.S. has noted Taiwan's significant strides in improving its IPR regime this past year, including the passage of legislation to create a specialized IPR court, the creation of an IP section in the Special Prosecutor's Office, increased numbers of raids and seizures of pirated optical media, counterfeit pharmaceuticals, and counterfeit luxury goods, and increased arrests of IPR infringers.
The U.S. urged Taiwan to continue its efforts to combat counterfeiting and Internet piracy and to pass pending IPR legislation. In particular, it recommends strengthening legislation to provide liability for Internet service providers and addressing copyright piracy on peer-to-peer networks.
The report also stated that the U.S. hopes Taiwan will continue its efforts to address these remaining IPR concerns and that it will work closely with Taiwan to achieve its future goals.


Updated : 2020-12-05 17:02 GMT+08:00