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In Brief

In Brief

CPC will not change price of wholesale oil
CPC Corp., Taiwan's state-owned oil refiner, will keep domestic wholesale gasoline and diesel prices unchanged this week.
The fall in crude oil in New York in the week ended yesterday translates to less than the 10 NT cents per liter change the refiner has set as the minimum to prompt an adjustment, the Taipei-based company said in a statement posted on its Web site yesterday.
The price of 95-RON gasoline will remain at NT$28 a liter and that of prime-grade diesel at NT$24.6 at CPC-run stations, the company said. RON, or research octane number, is a measure of fuel quality.
Open Skies deal
WASHINGTON, D.C.
U.S. and European officials signed an agreement Monday relaxing limits on airline service between Europe and the U.S., enabling airlines that had been barred from flying some routes to do so next year.
The agreement, known as "Open Skies," is designed to allow European and American airlines to fly any route between any city in Europe and any city in America. The agreement, signed Monday at a State Department ceremony, goes into effect at the end of next March, the State Department said.
The deal, long in the works, means more competition for the four carriers currently allowed to fly between the U.S. and London's Heathrow Airport, one of the world's busiest. British-based airlines British Airways PLC and Virgin Atlantic had enjoyed a joint monopoly along with U.S. carriers AMR Corp.'s American Airlines and UAL Corp.'s United Airlines over the lucrative trans-Atlantic routes.
Free trade talks
SEOUL, South Korea
South Korea and the European Union will begin talks next week here aimed at forging a free trade agreement, South Korea's Ministry of Finance and Economy said yesterday.
South Korean officials in related ministries and departments held a meeting yesterday presided over by Minister of Finance and Economy Kwon O-kyu to approve initiating the talks with the EU, the ministry said in a statement.
The first negotiating session will be held May 7-11 in Seoul.
New name
SEATTLE, Washington
A niche software company says it will rename one of its programs, admitting defeat in a three-year effort to win money from Microsoft Corp. after it claimed the name was too close to Excel.
Microsoft warned New York-based Savvysoft in 2004 that name TurboExcel was too similar to the spreadsheet program the world's largest software maker started selling in 1985.
Rich Tanenbaum, Savvysoft's chief executive officer, said he thought he had a shot at keeping the name because Microsoft had not registered Excel as a trademark by the time TurboExcel was set to launch. But unregistered product names are still protected by U.S. trademark law if consumers could be confused by newcomers with copycat names, and Tanenbaum found no backer.
Boeing's ambition
CHICAGO, Illinois
Boeing Co. Chief Executive Jim McNerney said Monday the aerospace company "turned the corner" in 2006 and is on pace to overtake rival Airbus as the world's largest commercial airplane maker within a year.
After posting a 2006 profit of US$2.2 billion amid a 15 percent jump in revenue to US$61 billion, the Chicago-based company last week beat Wall Street's projections with a 27 percent increase in first-quarter earnings and 8 percent higher sales.
Much of its momentum is due to a flood of orders for the more fuel-efficient new 787, which is scheduled for its first test flight on July 8 - the calendar equivalent of 7-8-7.


Updated : 2021-04-11 15:53 GMT+08:00