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In Brief

In Brief

Willis says being famous is 'weird'
NEW YORK, New York
Bruce Willis says being a film star has not brought him many perks.
"It's really ... weird to be famous," the actor tells Vanity Fair magazine in its June issue. "It gets you into restaurants easier than other people, but beyond that, personally, you could set fame on fire."
Willis, who has three daughters from his marriage to Demi Moore, says he is not a popular subject in the press these days. "They're not writing about guys my age much anymore, unless I do something naughty," he says.
As for his relationship with Moore, who married actor Ashton Kutcher, Willis says: "It's hard to understand, but we go on holidays together. We still raise our kids together - we still have that bond."
"I'm thrilled that Ashton turned out to be such a great guy. I love Demi, and I know she loves me," he says.
Mystery writers prize
NEW YORK, New York
Which work won a 2007 Edgar Allan Poe award for best play?
Elementary, my dear reader! It was "Sherlock Holmes: The Final Adventure," by Steven Dietz.
But that wasn't the only Edgar award winner with Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's fictional detective in the title. E.J. Wagner's nonfiction book, "The Science of Sherlock Holmes: From Baskerville Hall to the Valley of Fear," won for best critical/biographical book.
Jason Goodwin's "The Janissary Tree" was named best novel. And the best first novel was Alex Berenson's "The Faithful Spy."
The some of the other winners were:
Paperback original, "Snakeskin Shamisen," by Naomi Hirahara.
Fact crime, "Manhunt: The 12-Day Chase for Lincoln's Killer," by James L. Swanson.
Short story, "The Home Front," in "Death Do Us Part," by Charles Ardai.
Best juvenile, "Room One: A Mystery or Two," by Andrew Clements.


Updated : 2021-04-18 20:42 GMT+08:00