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Lead investigator in killing of World Cup cricket coach does not confirm drugging

Lead investigator in killing of World Cup cricket coach does not confirm drugging

The top policeman investigating the homicide in Jamaica of Pakistan World Cup cricket coach Bob Woolmer said Monday his team has not confirmed he was incapacitated by a drug before being strangled.
The British Broadcasting Corp. reported Monday that a toxicology test on Woolmer's body shows the presence of a drug that would have incapacitated him.
Mark Shields, the deputy police commissioner in Jamaica, told The Associated Press he has not received toxicology results and said emphatically his investigative team has not concluded that Woolmer was drugged.
"No results and we have NOT confirmed anything," the former Scotland Yard policeman said in a text message to AP from his cell phone. "Work is ongoing."
The BBC's Panorama program did not identify the drug or the source of its information, and said toxicology tests were to be given to Jamaican police next week. In London, Scotland Yard said they have no information and that the investigation and all inquiries are being handled by police in Jamaica.
Shields has said in the past that Woolmer _ a large, burly man _ may have been drugged before he was strangled to leave him defenseless.
Security video from the Kingston hotel where Woolmer died was sent to a laboratory in the Britain for review. Some images of the footage was obtained by the BBC.
One image shown on a BBC Web site showed Woolmer, dressed in a white T-shirt, talking with two people as he headed to an elevator in the Pegasus Hotel in Kingston, Jamaica, hours before he was killed in his room. The BBC identified the two people as fans.
Woolmer, 58, was found unconscious in his room and later declared dead on March 18, the day after his squad was upset by Ireland and eliminated from the World Cup, which was being played in the Caribbean. Police said he was strangled.
In an earlier interview with AP Television News, Shields said reported friction over religion in the Pakistan team was not a focus of the homicide probe.
"It doesn't feature in the investigation in any shape or form at the moment," Shields said.
After powerhouse Pakistan's first-round ouster to Ireland, team spokesman Pervez Jamil Mir told an inquiry in Pakistan that some players were more focused on praying than playing.
In an interview with APTN, Mir also said some players had pressured others to join them in Muslim prayers.
"There are players who have complained to me that they're forced into saying their prayers and there are players who say that they want to come back and relax and do their stuff and they're not allowed to do that," Mir said in the interview on April 21 in Springfield, Virginia.
"When there's time for prayers, go and say your prayers, but don't force it to them," Mir said.


Updated : 2021-01-17 14:28 GMT+08:00