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Sri Lanka coach undecided on his future

Sri Lanka coach undecided on his future

Tom Moody has made no decisions on his future and may continue as coach of Sri Lanka after its loss to Australia in the World Cup final.
The 41-year-old Australian guided Sri Lanka into Saturday's final after a series of impressive displays but had been expected to step down after the tournament.
He had been linked to the role of England coach and even more strongly to provincial team Western Australia. Meanwhile, Sri Lanka has remained hopeful it could persuade him to stay on.
Moody said Sunday he had not thought about his next step and would not make any decision at least until he got back to Sri Lanka on Thursday.
"I've had one night's sleep, which wasn't a long night," Moody said. "I'm not making any decisions on my future until I've had a chance to speak to the Sri Lankan cricket board, until I've had a chance to reflect and have a look to see where I want to be professionally and personally."
A World Cup winner as a player with Australia in 1987 and 1999, Moody took charge of Sri Lanka two years ago after being considered for the high-pressure role of India coach.
He introduced a new ruthlessness and pragmatism to the team but still let his players exhibit a brand of cricket as exciting as any at this year's tournament.
Moody's influence was crucial in building a stronger Sri Lanka team than the one that won the 1996 World Cup. His focus was such that he left consideration of his future to one side, even though that meant the England job was filled by the time he became available.
"I have intentionally put this whole thing on the back burner because it wouldn't be right professionally if I didn't give 100 percent to Sri Lanka," he said.
Batsman Mahela Jayawardene has attributed his own transformation from an inconsistent batsman into the second highest run scorer at the tournament to Moody.
"The captaincy probably would have helped, but Tom definitely has pushed me to the limits," Jayawardene said. "He's not happy when I'm cruising. He's not happy with anyone cruising."
Moody said the fact that he felt he could still improve the team, which has a nucleus of young players for the future such as opener Upul Tharanga, wicketkeeper Kumar Sangakkara and pace bowler Lasith Malinga, could persuade him to stay on.
"The last two years we've made significant progress as a group," Moody said. "The next World Cup's in four years time.
"If we continue that upward curve and continue the professionalism that we are adopting ... there's no reason why Sri Lanka as a cricketing country can't compete with the likes of Australia."
There was, as Moody said, "plenty of meat left on the bone" of Sri Lankan cricket.
Moody said the challenge of working with players from another country and culture had helped him improve as a coach and develop personally. He did not consider the travel between Sri Lanka and his homeland was a problem.
He simply said he wanted to make sure he considered his family in any future plans.
"I've got some high values as a family man and that's very important to me," he said. As much as I am passionate about what I do, I like to think I've got a reasonable balance in my life."


Updated : 2021-02-28 00:01 GMT+08:00