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Eriksson ready to coach again

Eriksson ready to coach again

Former England manager Sven-Goran Eriksson wants to prove he's still a top coach.
"Before England, I had never been sacked (fired) in my life," the 59-year-old Swede was quoted as saying in Britain's Sunday Times newspaper. "I don't sit here pining about it, but I loved being a manager and I am still young enough to do the job."
Eriksson is still being paid 6,500 pounds (US$12,500; euro9,500) a week by the Football Association as part of his compensation package, which ends in June.
Eriksson reportedly contacted Palermo about its vacant coaching post, but the Serie A club said it was not interested. Previously, Eriksson coached AS Roma, Fiorentina, Sampdoria and Lazio in the Italian league.
Eriksson's final match in charge of England was its 3-1 defeat on penalties to Portugal in the 2006 World Cup quarterfinals.
"For the first few nights back in Sweden, I couldn't sleep and couldn't really stop thinking about what had happened," Eriksson said. "It wasn't like I was in a depression but it was a recurring thought."
Eriksson defended his six years in charge of the national team when England reached the quarterfinals of the 2002 and 2006 World Cups and the 2004 European Championship.
"Is it a failure to lose on penalties when you play 10 against 11 for the last hour?" Eriksson said, referring to the Portugal match in 2006 when Wayne Rooney was sent off.
"In the knockout stages of the World Cup, the differences between the teams are not so great that you can afford big mistakes. They will kill you."
Eriksson was England's first foreign manager and the Swede remained angry at his treatment by the English press, including a reporter from the News of the World pretending to be a businessman interested in hiring him.
"One newspaper caused me to lose my job, more or less," Eriksson said. "There are two reasons I'm not manager of England today: firstly, we did not win the World Cup and secondly, because one newspaper treated me unfairly. They wrote that I said things I did not."
Eriksson was also attacked by the British media after being covertly photographed arriving for a meeting with Chelsea's Russian owner Roman Abramovich in 2003, before Jose Mourinho's appointment as coach.
"I had a contract with England, it was going to finish, and in football you can't really wait until your contract runs out," Eriksson said. "You are in an impossible situation as England coach, because if you talk to anyone else you are seen as a traitor. Why should that be?"
Eriksson insisted his colorful private life was his own business.
"As long as I am not doing anything criminal _ and I was not _ it is not anybody else's business," he said. "My private life has absolutely nothing to do with my football."


Updated : 2021-03-08 15:18 GMT+08:00