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U.N. bid under name of Taiwan 'difficult,' former official claims

U.N. bid under name of Taiwan 'difficult,' former official claims

Taiwan's bid to apply to join the United Nations under the name of "Taiwan" involves great difficulty, a former Republic of China minister of foreign affairs said Friday.
Addressing the issue during a conference titled "Taiwan and Its Contexts" held at Yale University, Fredrick Chien said the ROC has been "unfairly and unreasonably" ignored by the international community since its seat at the United Nations was replaced by the People's Republic of China in 1971.
While promoting a campaign to re-enter the United Nations over the past 14 years, Taiwan has not tried to challenge Beijing's representation at the United Nations but has emphasized the "unfairness" of the world organization excluding Taiwan, Chien said.
According to Chien, "it will be a very difficult matter" if Taiwan is to apply for U.N. membership under the name of "Taiwan" because Taiwan must be a "new country" in order to enter the United Nations as a new member, which brings up the issue of declaring independence.
In addition, Chien pointed out, any application for new U.N. membership is required to obtain the unanimous consent of the five permanent members of the U.N. Security Council - one of which is China.
Therefore, "there will be a very big problem" if Taiwan is to apply to join the United Nations under the name of "Taiwan" this September, he said.
Meanwhile, analyzing the democratic development of Taiwan at the conference, Chu Yun-han, a professor of political science at National Taiwan University, said the problems of partisan struggle and split national identity in Taiwan are not expected to be resolved in the near future.
While the people hinged high expectations on President Chen Shui-bian when he was elected in 2000 and again in 2004, the ruling Democratic Progressive Party has failed to obtain a majority status in the Legislative Yuan in the past two legislative elections, Chu noted.
Despite this fact, the DPP has refused to relinquish the right to appoint the premier, resulting in a continuation of confrontation between the ruling and opposition camps, Chu said.


Updated : 2021-01-26 10:44 GMT+08:00