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Schilling angered by questioning of spot on playoff socks

Schilling angered by questioning of spot on playoff socks

Boston Red Sox ace Curt Schilling, angry at having a career-defining moment called into question, struck back on Friday.
On his personal Web site, Schilling offered a US$1 million wager for charity to anyone who could prove the blood that appeared to soak through one of his socks in a 2004 playoff game was fake.
In order to start Game 6 of the 2004 American League Championship Series against the New York Yankees, Schilling had a tendon in his right ankle stitched in place so it wouldn't flop over the bone.
With blood seeping through his sock, Schilling allowed one run over seven innings in a dramatic 4-2 triumph. Boston went on to win Game 7, becoming the first team to comeback from a three-games-to-none deficit to win a playoff series.
But speculation regarding the nature of the substance on the sock arose Wednesday when Baltimore Orioles broadcaster Gary Thorne claimed that Schilling had red paint - not blood - on his sock.
"I'll wager one million dollars to the charity of anyone's choice, versus the same amount to ALS (Schilling's charity for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis research)," Schilling said. "If the blood on the sock is fake, I'll donate a million dollars to that person's charity. ... Any takers?"
Thorne had said he was told by Boston catcher Doug Mirabelli that it wasn't really blood from Schilling's injured ankle that stained his sock. Mirabelli emphatically denied the account, prompting Thorne to apologize and say he had misunderstood.


Updated : 2021-04-13 22:29 GMT+08:00