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Snow falls on Taiwan's Xueshan

Taiwan sees earliest snowfall in recent years

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Snow seen on Xueshan. (Facebook, Chiang Wu-ming photo)

Snow seen on Xueshan. (Facebook, Chiang Wu-ming photo)

TAIPEI (Taiwan News) — Snow fell today (Nov. 10) on Xueshan, marking the earliest snow seen in Taiwan in recent years.

Cold temperatures brought by a northeast monsoon combined with abundant moisture resulted in snowfall on the mountain. The Shei-pa National Park Headquarters stated early this morning that snow was seen to have accumulated from Xueshan Cirque to Xueshan's main peak, representing the first snow of this fall season.

A mountaineer surnamed Chiang (蔣) at 12:08 p.m. posted two videos on the Facebook group Shei-pa National Park Climbing Forums showing snow falling on Xueshan. In the videos, snow can be clearly seen beginning to dust the landscape white as excited climbers huddle together to document the event.

Chen Chun-shan (陳俊山), deputy director of the Shei-pa National Park Headquarters told CNA that snow had started falling at around 6 or 7 a.m, as temperatures were low and sufficient moisture was in the air. Chen said that approximately 2 to 3 centimeters of snow had accumulated on the mountain.

Snow falls on Taiwan's Xueshan
Snow seen on Xueshan on Wednesday. (Chiang Wu-ming photo)

He said that due to the unstable phone signals in the mountains, it had been difficult to maintain communication with personnel at the peak. However, he said that based on the drop in humidity by noon, he surmised that the snowfall had stopped.

According to Chen, the video was of snow falling next to the Sanliujiu Lodge. This indicates that elevations of 3,500 meters and higher are likely to see snow, especially if there is adequate moisture.

Chen said that in previous years, the snow management service in the national park usually started in January. Chen stated that today's snowfall is unusual in that it took place in the fall and just after Li dong (立冬), the first day of winter on the Lunar Calendar, and is the earliest snow seen in Taiwan in recent years.