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China says US inflaming tensions with Taiwan and India

China faces mounting geopolitical problems to east and west, according to CNN report

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Military trucks roll along a mountainous road toward the Line of Actual Control (LAC) along the Sino-Indian border in the Himalayas.

Military trucks roll along a mountainous road toward the Line of Actual Control (LAC) along the Sino-Indian border in the Himalayas. (AP photo)

TAIPEI (Taiwan News) — As tensions in the Taiwan Strait ratchet up to new heights, China faces a renewed risk of conflict on its border with India, compounding geopolitical pressure on the superpower, according to CNN.

Key positions along the Himalayan border are being buttressed while talks between the sides are breaking down, according to the CNN report. In recent days, China and India have even briefly detained one another’s troops, according to unverified reports cited by CNN.

In the wake of the deadly clashes that occurred along the border in June 2020, military leaders from both sides have held a series of talks to minimize tensions and avoid a repeat of the violence. Yet the latest meeting, the 13th session held on Sunday (Oct.10), ended with both sides accusing the other of being uncooperative, according to CNN.

India’s Ministry of Defense said the “Chinese side was not agreeable and also could not provide any forward-looking proposals.” Meanwhile, a PLA spokesperson said “India still insisted on the unreasonable and unrealistic demands, which made the negotiations more difficult.”

Rumors of new clashes have circulated in both countries’ media. These apparent scuffles have not resulted in death or injury, according to reports.

That a renewed border fight should coincide with rising tensions in the Taiwan Strait is, according to Chinese state media, not a coincidence. Most state media outlets blame the U.S., which CNN describes as a “familiar answer.”

The CNN piece concludes by saying that although Taiwan and the Himalayas are 4,500 kilometers apart, Beijing views the U.S. as the main culprit in raising tensions at the two flashpoints.