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Visitors traveling from India subject to centralized quarantine in Taiwan

Taiwan tightens border control as India faces explosive surge in COVID cases

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An Indian Sikh offers prayers as he takes a holy dip in the sacred pond at the Golden Temple in Amritsar, India, May 1, 2021. 

An Indian Sikh offers prayers as he takes a holy dip in the sacred pond at the Golden Temple in Amritsar, India, May 1, 2021.  (AP photo)

Update: 2021-5-3
The CECC announced on Monday (May 3) that foreigners who have visited India in the two weeks prior to their intended arrival date in Taiwan will be banned from entry starting Tuesday.

TAIPEI (Taiwan News) — Anyone who has been to India within 14 days of their intended arrival date in Taiwan will be quarantined in a centralized center starting Tuesday (May 4), the Central Epidemic Command Center (CECC) announced Sunday (May 2).

Visitors subject to the new rule include those who have traveled to or transited in India. They will also be required to receive a coronavirus test at the beginning and end of their quarantine before self-monitoring their health for a week afterward.

The cost of the centralized isolation and virus screening will be shouldered by the government. Health and Welfare Minister Chen Shih-chung (陳時中), who chairs the CECC, announced at a regular COVID response briefing.

The move comes after the South Asian country reported the highest single-day tally of COVID cases, with a record-breaking 400,000 reported on Saturday (May 1). At least 11 Taiwanese working in India have contracted the virus, including one who died Saturday, CNA reported, citing Taiwan’s representative offices in India.

The deceased, a 49-year-old man surnamed Yang (楊) who worked at a tech company, had reportedly received a vaccine produced by the Chinese company Sinovac Biotech. He was among the five of a Gurugram City-based Taiwanese company's eight employees who were infected despite inoculation with a Sinovac jab.

Taiwan sent its first batch of humanitarian medical relief supplies to India on Sunday morning.

Scientists are studying whether the Indian variant B.1.617 is to blame for the spike in the country's cases this month. Chen said Taiwan has not reported any cases of this variant, which has mutations that make it more transmissible, according to Reuters.


Updated : 2021-05-16 12:12 GMT+08:00