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The Latest: Germany faces 'crisis of trust' amid pandemic

A police car patrols people walking on the runway of the former Tempelhof airport, that is now a public park, in Berlin, Germany, Friday, April 2, 202...
Italian Army officers patrol Rome's central Piazza del Popolo, Saturday, April 3, 2021. Italy went into lockdown on Easter weekend in its effort to ba...
FILE - In this Friday, March 19, 2021 file photo people line up to get their AstraZeneca vaccine shot at La Nuvola (The Cloud) convention center that ...
Pedestrians walk past La Esperanza de Triana during the Holy Week in Seville, southern Spain, Tuesday, March 30, 2021. Few Catholics in devout souther...
A restored figure of Jesus arrives into Nuestra Senora de la Candelaria church in Seville, southern Spain, Thursday, March 25, 2021. Few Catholics in ...

A police car patrols people walking on the runway of the former Tempelhof airport, that is now a public park, in Berlin, Germany, Friday, April 2, 202...

Italian Army officers patrol Rome's central Piazza del Popolo, Saturday, April 3, 2021. Italy went into lockdown on Easter weekend in its effort to ba...

FILE - In this Friday, March 19, 2021 file photo people line up to get their AstraZeneca vaccine shot at La Nuvola (The Cloud) convention center that ...

Pedestrians walk past La Esperanza de Triana during the Holy Week in Seville, southern Spain, Tuesday, March 30, 2021. Few Catholics in devout souther...

A restored figure of Jesus arrives into Nuestra Senora de la Candelaria church in Seville, southern Spain, Thursday, March 25, 2021. Few Catholics in ...

FRANKFURT, Germany — President Frank-Walter Steinmeier said that Germany is enduring a “crisis of trust” and urged the country to “pull together” as it weathers a second Easter amid pandemic restrictions and dissatisfaction over the government’s response.

In the text of an address to be broadcast Saturday, Steinmeier conceded that “there have been mistakes” regarding testing, digital solutions and vaccinations.

“Trust — in a democracy it rests on a very fragile understanding between citizens and the state: ‘You, state, do your part, I, citizen, do mine,’” he said. “I know that you, the citizens, are doing your part in this historic crisis. You have done much and you have gone without much.”

“Your expectation for those in government is, 'get it together.'”

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THE VIRUS OUTBREAK:

— Young professionals cut ahead of older Italians for vaccine

— UK regulator reports 30 clot cases linked to AstraZeneca jab

— AP PHOTOS: Spain’s Seville settles for subdued Easter Week

— California OKs indoor sports, concerts as COVID cases plunge

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Follow AP’s pandemic coverage at https://apnews.com/hub/coronavirus-pandemic, https://apnews.com/hub/coronavirus-vaccine and https://apnews.com/UnderstandingtheOutbreak

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HERE’S WHAT ELSE IS HAPPENING:

LONDON — Britain’s medicines regulator says it has identified 30 cases of rare blood clot events associated with the AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine but stressed the benefits “continue to outweigh any risks.”

The Medicines and Healthcare Regulatory Agency said late Friday the risk associated with this type of blood clot is “very small” and that the public should continue to take up the vaccine when offered it.

The agency said the cases relate to the period up to March 24, during which 18.1 million doses of the vaccine had been administered. Concerns over the AstraZeneca vaccine prompted some countries including Canada, France, Germany, and the Netherlands to restrict its use to older people.

The World Health Organization has urged countries to continue using the jab.

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ROME — Octogenarians in Tuscany watched in disbelief and indignation as lawyers, magistrates, professors and other younger professionals got vaccinated against COVID-19 before them, despite government pledges of prioritizing Italy’s oldest citizens.

Even some of their adult children jumped ahead of them. By one estimate, Italy’s failure to prioritize the over-80s and those with fragile health conditions has cost thousands of lives in a country with Europe’s oldest population and its second-highest loss of life in the pandemic.

As the elderly were elbowed aside, a dozen prominent senior citizens in Tuscany published a letter calling out the authorities for what they said was a violation of their health care rights enshrined in Italy’s Constitution.

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SEVILLE, Spain — Few Roman Catholics in devout southern Spain would have ever imagined an April without the pomp and ceremony of Holy Week processions.

With the coronavirus pandemic unremitting, they will miss them for a second year.

The streets of Seville and other Spanish cities again went without Palm Sunday, Maundy Thursday and Good Friday celebrations marking the life, death and resurrection of Christ. The infection rate for COVID-19 is still too high for groups to be allowed to gather.

For 50-year-old Roberto Ruiz, the extravagant Semana Santa, or Holy Week, processions mark the cycle of time in Seville. Without them, he feels unsettled.

“You don’t fully wake up if Palm Sunday isn’t celebrated,” he said. “The year neither begins nor ends. This is like being trapped in Groundhog Day. Every day is the same as the rest. The feeling is that of a year which has been lost.”

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SEOUL, South Korea -- South Korea’s daily increase in coronavirus infections exceeded 500 for the fourth straight day, a pace unseen since January, as experts raise concern about another viral surge amid a slow rollout in vaccines.

The 543 new cases reported by the Korea Disease Control and Prevention Agency on Saturday brought the national caseload to 104,736, including 1,740 deaths.

More than 320 of the new cases came from the Seoul metropolitan area, home to half of the country’s 51 million people, where officials have struggled to stem transmissions tied to various places, including bars, offices, factories, schools, and gyms.

Health authorities this week said they are considering whether to approve rapid coronavirus tests that would allow people to regularly test themselves at home as they look for further tools to fight the virus.

South Korea has wrestled with a slower rollout of vaccines than many other developed economies, with officials insisting they could afford a wait-and-see approach as its outbreak isn’t as dire as in the United States or Europe.

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SAN FRANCISCO — California on Friday cleared the way for people to attend indoor concerts, theater performances and NBA games for the first time in more than a year as the rate of people testing positive for the coronavirus in the state nears a record low.

State officials won’t require testing or proof of vaccination for some of those events, but they do limit the number of people allowed to attend. Events that do require testing and vaccinations will be allowed to have more paying customers than those that don’t. Only people who live in California can attend these live performances.

The rules are different for private indoor gatherings, including weddings, meetings or conferences. Those are only to be allowed if all guests test negative for the coronavirus at least 72 hours in advance or show proof of full vaccination.


Updated : 2021-05-08 19:15 GMT+08:00