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Taiwan's indigenous artists spread the word in Vancouver

LunarFest in Vancouver features installations from indigenous artists in Taiwan

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LunarFest in Vancouver features Taiwan's indigenous artists. (Michael Lin photo)

LunarFest in Vancouver features Taiwan's indigenous artists. (Michael Lin photo)

TAIPEI (Taiwan News)— LunarFest in Vancouver features installations from Taiwan's indigenous artists and will run through February.

Hosted by the Asian-Canadian Special Events Association (ACSEA), LunarFest features a display of giant lunar lanterns. There are also works from Taiwanese artists in the Plaza of the Vancouver Art Gallery until Feb. 28.

The pandemic has not been easy on the organizers of Vancouver's annual LunarFest celebration, reported The Georgia Straight. This year they had to change the venue for the exhibition from Jack Poole Plaza to the Vancouver Art Gallery plaza.

According to the website, the eight displayed lanterns are from two indigenous families. The Pavavaljung family of artists come from the Paiwan tribe.

ACSEA stated in a press release that Taiwan indigenous artist Pairang Pavavaljung had teamed up with his sons, Etan Pavavaljung and Sakuliu Pavavaljung, along with his grandson Reretan Pavavaljung, for "The Lantern City" project. They all created artworks to showcase the variety of Paiwan culture.

Taiwan's indigenous artists spread the word in Vancouver
Works from Pairang, Etan, Sakuliu, and Reretan. (Reagan Kai photo)

Reretan collaborated with award-winning singer Aljenljeng Tjaluvie on her album's graphic design. His traditional Paiwan costumes made it onto the cover of Vancouver publication "The Georgia Straight."

Reretan's father, Sakuliu, will represent Taiwan at the 59th edition of the Venice Biennale, in 2022. His Vancouver installation, "The Paiwan Wedding," portrays tribal folklore through a ritual called "Paukuz".

The Pavavaljung family originally comes from Pingtung and they are all artists.

Taiwan's indigenous artists spread the word in Vancouver
Reretan on The Georgia Straight cover. (ACSEA photo)


Updated : 2021-03-04 09:24 GMT+08:00