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Why does Taipei adore Kebuke?

Taiwan tea shop thrives with attention to design

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(Instagram, @jenjen.love.eating photo) (Facebook, @kebuke2008 image)  

(Instagram, @jenjen.love.eating photo) (Facebook, @kebuke2008 image)  

TAIPEI (Taiwan News) — Kebuke (可不可), established in 2008 in Taichung, is a popular drink shop best known for its black tea and traditional art.

As a newcomer in the beverage industry, Kebuke managed to enter the market with ease and build itself a loyal fan base. The company's attention to design sets it apart from its competitors, with the traditional art that adorns its social media and merchandise helping to brand it.

Inspired by cobalt blue and cream-colored traditional porcelain teapots, Kebuke's decorated lids and cups bearing Asiatic patterns are easy to recognize. Every Kebuke store has counters and cabinets made of wood and serpentine, adding to the distinct feel.

Why does Taipei adore Kebuke?
Every Kebuke store has a cool-toned interior with splashes of wood and marble. (Facebook, @kbkch2017)

In addition to drinks, Kebuke sells various other tea-related products and often works with other brands to collaborate on merchandise. Teaming up with Pokemon, they sold tea sets, vases, and drinks, keeping their theme of white and blue flower patterns consistent.

Why does Taipei adore Kebuke?
Successful ollaborations with Marie Claire and Pokemon increased Kebuke's popularity. (cool-style.com.tw photo)

The Pokemon-themed products, which featured various animated characters printed on cups and lids as well as tea sets, helped the company to go viral.

The drink store also does well on Instagram, where it has over 19,000 followers and several fan accounts. Customers often tag and post about the different Kebuke stores they visit, noting each shop's collectible store cards with special designs.

According to the store's website, the concept of the cards is to blend local history, geography, culture, as well as other elements.

Why does Taipei adore Kebuke?
Each store has a unique and often satirical card that customers can collect. (gvm.com.tw photo)