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Taiwanese scientist learns to face ‘uncertainty’ in Antarctica

Lin Ying-tsen becomes nation’s first female scientist to spend winter at South Pole

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Lin Ying-tsen studied high-frequency gravitational waves in Antarctica last year. (Lin Ying-tsen photo)

Lin Ying-tsen studied high-frequency gravitational waves in Antarctica last year. (Lin Ying-tsen photo)

TAIPEI (Taiwan News) — National Central University Space Science and Engineering associate professor Lin Ying-tsen (林映岑) said she learned to deal with "uncertainty" while living in Antarctica last year.

During a press conference on Monday (Jan. 25), Lin revealed that she had collected more than 1,600 hours of light detection and ranging (LIDAR) data during her year of research at the U.S.' McMurdo Station in Antarctica. She said she had collaborated with the University of Colorado Boulder to study high-frequency gravitational waves in the region.

Lin said she was stationed at the South Pole for a total of 54 weeks and that she had to endure an average temperature of -40 degrees Celsius on a daily basis. She said that during her stay, she developed the courage to face any challenge and was content to "get trapped" by the extreme weather conditions.

She pointed out that penguins in Antarctica are not intimidated by humans and that they are often spotted near human structures. She also noted that aquatic birds would sometimes disturb the sleep of local residents with their high-pitched calls.

Lin said she appreciated the rare opportunity to witness the beauty of Antarctica, including the polar nights. She urged Taiwanese who are passionate about science to visit Antarctica and learn more about the continent, reported Liberty Times.

Lin is the country's first female scientist to spend the winter in Antarctica. In October last year, she sent a postcard to President Tsai Ing-wen (蔡英文) and lauded the government's epidemic prevention efforts.

Taiwanese scientist learns to face ‘uncertainty’ in Antarctica
Lin Ying-tsen sent a postcard to President Tsai Ing-wen from Antarctica. (CNA photo)

Taiwanese scientist learns to face ‘uncertainty’ in Antarctica
Lin praises Taiwan's epidemic prevention efforts in her postcard. (Instagram, Tsai Ing-wen photo)


Updated : 2021-02-26 04:33 GMT+08:00