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China forcing Taiwan's hand, Chen says

PRC's aggressive actions pushing island toward independence, president declares

China forcing Taiwan's hand, Chen says

China's placement of 988 missiles targeting Taiwan and its enactment of the Anti-Secession Law would force Taiwan to move closer to declaring independence, President Chen Shui-bian (陳水扁) said yesterday in an interview with two journalists from the Deutsche Presse Agentur.
Unlike the governments of former East and West Germany that were able to regard each other as an independent sovereignty when they sat down to unification talks in the 1990s, Beijing refuses to see Taiwan as an equal sovereignty on the issue of cross-strait relations, Chen told the German journalists.
"We note that sovereignty, democracy, peace and reciprocity resulted in Germany's unification," Chen said, adding that the two sides recognized each other's independent existence and were able to sign a unification treaty.
However, Beijing's attitude toward Taiwan diverges from those four principles that eventually led to the unification of Germany, the president said. Beijing never acknowledged Taiwan as an independent nation, instead, it proclaims that Taiwan is part of its territory and ignores the right of Taiwan's 23 million people to decide their own future, he said.
On the question of peace, "China responded to the (Taiwan people's) hopes for non-violent dialogue by deploying missiles and enacting an Anti-Secession Law," which gives legal grounds for Beijing to resort to force should Taiwan declare independence, the president stated.
Because China's approach runs counter to the four principles adopted by the Germans, "we think that the two sides (across the Taiwan Strait) are unlikely to unify in the short term. (Beijing's attitude) will also force the Taiwan people to move forward on a course of (declaring) independence," Chen said.
He urged that the members of China's National People's Congress, who are slated to hold an annual meeting next week, invalidate the Anti-Secession Law, which he called "a bad law that has hurt the Taiwan people's heart" since it was approved in March 2005 by the PRC congress.
Chen, in response to the journalists' question of whether he wished to convey any messages the Chinese congressmen, said that he wanted to invite Chinese lawmakers to Taiwan to witness the year-end legislative elections and next year's presidential poll.
"On behalf of Taiwan's 23 million people, I want to invite China's legislative speaker to lead a delegation to Taiwan to witness how Taiwan people elect their national leader and members of the parliament," the president said.
Chen, whose election as president in 2000 marked the first non-violent rotation of power in Taiwan to end half-century of rule by the Kuomintang, told the DPA that he remains confident that his Democratic Progressive Party would retain power in the 2008 presidential election.
"The winner is unlikely to be a KMT candidate and is unlikely to be (former KMT Chairman) Ma Ying-jeou (馬英九)," Chen said.


Updated : 2021-10-17 17:42 GMT+08:00