Taipei sizzles with second-highest temperature since 1897

Scorching 39 degrees highest temperature ever recorded in July in Taipei

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CWB map of Sunday's sizzling temperatures. 

CWB map of Sunday's sizzling temperatures. 

TAIPEI (Taiwan News) — As summer temperatures continue to soar, Taipei on Sunday (July 19) saw the mercury rise to nearly 40 degrees Celsius, the second-highest temperature in the city in 123 years and the hottest ever recorded in the month of July.

According to the Central Weather Bureau (CWB), highs in Taipei reached 39 degrees on Sunday. The CWB issued high-temperature alerts in 16 counties and cities, with an orange heat alert, which indicates temperatures over 36 degrees, posted for Taipei that day.

By 1 p.m., the mercury had shot up to 39 degrees, setting a new all-time record for the month of July in the capital city. It is also the second-highest temperature recorded there since its weather station was established in 1897, trailing only the 39.3-degree high recorded on Aug. 8, 2013.

The highest temperature recorded in Taiwan on Sunday was 39.3 degrees in Nantou County at 1:30 p.m. However, the weather bureau cautioned that the Nantou station is an unmanned observation platform, and as such temperatures taken there are not included in the historical record.

There is no rest for the weary, as a Pacific high-pressure system will ensure continued searing temperatures on Monday and Tuesday (June 20 and 21). The CWB has again issued a red heat alert for Taipei and Nantou County, with highs likely to reach 38 degrees, while orange alerts have been posted for Keelung City, New Taipei City, Hsinchu County, Changhua County, Yunlin County, Tainan City, Kaohsiung City, Pingtung County, Yilan County, Hualien County, and Taitung County.