Global Cooperation and Training Framework highlights Taiwan's value: AIT head

AIT director says Global Cooperation and Training Framework promotes 'Taiwan model'

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AIT Director Brett Christensen

AIT Director Brett Christensen (CNA photo)

TAIPEI (Taiwan News) — On Tuesday (June 1), Director of the American Institute in Taiwan (AIT) Brent Christensen remarked that the U.S. has always supported Taiwan's participation in global organizations.

At a press conference commemorating the fifth anniversary of the founding of the Global Cooperation and Training Framework (GCTF), Christiansen stated that the U.S. has always fought to increase Taiwan's international space but at the same time, he also believes that information exchanges between Taiwan and the world "should not be arbitrarily determined by the leadership of international organizations," CNA reported.

The U.S. and Taiwan established GCTF in 2015, with Japan joining last year as the organization's third co-host. Christiansen expressed that the purpose of GCTF is to demonstrate the island nation's humanitarian capabilities, similar to the "Taiwan can help" campaign that the Ministry of Foreign Affairs has promoted amid the Wuhan coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

GCTF is a platform for Taiwan to share its expertise in public health, law enforcement, disaster relief, energy cooperation, and many other fields with global partners.

Christiansen added that unlike many international meetings, which are often purely symbolic, speech-laden events, GCTF's workshops are practical and focus on key issues in order to create substantial results. Workshops are usually carried out behind closed doors, allowing participants to exchange ideas without hesitation, he was quoted as saying.

The AIT director also mentioned that many countries are now learning the "Taiwan model" upon seeing the nation's successful control of the coronavirus. At this moment, everyone should be thankful for platforms like GCTF that are "not subject to political interference," he exclaimed, hinting at Chinese influence in the World Health Organization.

Christiansen said that he looked forward to seeing more countries treat Taiwan as a reliable partner and model of democracy.