Former legislator Hsiao Bi-khim tapped as Taiwan’s National Security Council adviser

Hsiao, four-term legislator, has over 10 years experience on Foreign and National Defense Committee

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Former DDP Legislator Hsiao Bi-khim

Former DDP Legislator Hsiao Bi-khim (CNA photo)

TAIPEI (Taiwan News) — President Tsai Ing-wen (蔡英文) has tapped former Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) Legislator Hsiao Bi-khim (蕭美琴) as a member of the National Security Council’s (NSC) advisory board.

Hsiao will take office on Wednesday (April 1).

Presidential Office spokesman Xavier Chang (張惇涵) said in a statement on Tuesday that Tsai decided to appoint Hsiao to the NSC position in the hope that her work will strengthen Taiwan’s participation in the international community and its ability to respond to world affairs. President Tsai believes that Hsiao will be able to help the president advance various international policy goals, Chang said.

Chang added that Hsiao has a deep understanding of international affairs from her longtime involvement in Taiwan’s dealings with other countries, especially in the areas of Taiwan-US relations, political party diplomacy, and parliamentary diplomacy.

The spokesman went on to mention that Hsiao is a four-term legislator who has over 10 years experience on the Foreign and National Defense Committee as well as serving her constituents, which will make her even more suitable for the position. Hsiao was defeated in a legislative election earlier this year, and since then there has been speculation that she would be appointed to an important position in the central government.

In recent times, when the world is grappling with COVID-19, it’s even more necessary for Taiwan to have its finger on the pulse of political and economic changes both at home and abroad, Chang said. It’s especially important to strengthen cooperation with like-minded countries, facilitate Taiwan’s international communication, continue to develop Taiwan-US relations, and increase exchanges and dialogue with countries in the Indo-Pacific region, the spokesman added.