Chinese woman describes Wuhan virus patients being burned alive

Video shows Chinese woman describe Wuhan coronavirus patients being stuffed into body bags and burned alive

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(YouTube, Youth Production screenshot)

(YouTube, Youth Production screenshot)

TAIPEI (Taiwan News) — As the World Health Organization (WHO) praises China for its "tailored approach" to handling the Wuhan coronavirus outbreak, a video has surfaced of a Chinese woman vividly describing patients being bound in body bags and cremated while still alive.

On Feb. 24, a group of overseas Chinese students which calls itself Youth Production (少年譯製) uploaded a video of a Chinese woman approximately in her 60s sharing her traumatic experience surviving a stay in a Wuhan hospital while infected with the novel coronavirus (COVID-19). In the video, titled "Burned Alive," a woman wearing a surgical face mask and speaking with a heavy Wuhan accent tells her harrowing tale to a taxi driver who is covered from head to toe in protective gear.

She starts by saying that she was in bed number 18, when another patient, a male in his 70s, was admitted on the morning Jan. 28 and stayed in bed 17. She said that by that afternoon, a team from Tianjin had arrived and found that the patient was having difficulty inhaling.

The woman said that she was experiencing the same symptoms, but not as severely as she was younger. She said that the man was weak but was still breathing when medical workers "bound his head" and then his hands and feet, which were "still moving."

The traumatized survivor then said that medical personnel placed the man in a black plastic bag and pulled up the zipper, before placing him in yet another plastic bag. She said they then wrapped the man in two more layers with an unidentified material.

When the driver asked what kind of medical treatment was offered to the man, she said that the hospital only had oxygen. She said that the lack of medical supplies made the facility feel more like a "nursing home" than the infectious disease hospital it claimed to be.

The driver then asked if the man was burned alive. She confirmed that the man was still alive when he was sent for cremation, and she said there were fears that the toxic gas from the crematorium would spread.

She claimed that she actually saw several cases of living patients stuffed in body bags and taken for cremation. She said that another elderly man in her isolation ward was still breathing but was also sent for cremation.

The woman said that she saw this on several occasions and began to burst into tears as she thought of the "miserable" fate of her fellow patients. When the driver asked why doctors did not try to save the first patient, she said that there was very little in the way of medical supplies available other than oxygen.

The horrified woman said she had never seen anything like it and said the patients were treated "just like dead dogs." The video closed with the woman saying that those who were dead "were stacked one after another in yellow body bags."

A staffer from a funeral home in Wuhan, the epicenter of the novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) outbreak, claimed the number of bodies she and her co-workers have had to transport and cremate each day is four to five times higher than the usual amount. Based on the account, the daily average number of bodies suspected of being coronavirus victims is estimated at 225 at a single Wuhan funeral home or 4,725 in total between Jan. 22 and Feb. 12.

There are eight registered funeral homes in Wuhan. If the funeral home staffer's account is true, it would mean there were 1,628 deaths per day in the city and a total of 34,200 in the 21 days leading up to the report.

World Health Organization (WHO) Assistant Director-General Dr. Bruce Aylward this week lavished praise on Communist China for its handling of the outbreak and revealed his doubts that many other countries in the world will be able to contain it. After having safely returned to WHO headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland, Aylward expressed confidence in the communist regime's health care system, proclaiming: "You know, if I had COVID-19, I'd want to be treated in China."