‘One country, two systems’ not likely to prevail in Taiwan post-election

Formula opposed by both pro-independence and pro-China candidates

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Pro-democracy activists hold up placards of Chinese President Xi Jinping at a ferry terminal in Hong Kong.

Pro-democracy activists hold up placards of Chinese President Xi Jinping at a ferry terminal in Hong Kong. (AP photo)

TAIPEI (Taiwan News) — The “one country, two systems” formula touted by Chinese leader Xi Jinping (習近平) will never prevail in Taiwan, whoever wins the presidential election on Saturday (Jan. 11), according to a report by Radio Television Hong Kong (RTHK).

The idea of China ruling Taiwan under the “one country, two systems” framework has been rejected by both of the two main contenders in the election, incumbent President Tsai Ing-wen (蔡英文) of the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) and Han Kuo-yu (韓國瑜) of the Kuomintang (KMT) party, said Li Da-jung (李大中), associate professor at Tamkang University's Graduate Institute of International Affairs and Strategic Studies.

As mainstream public opinion widely opposes the scheme, whoever is elected as the leader of Taiwan for the next four years is not likely to put the option on the table, the report quoted Li as saying.

Beijing’s attitude towards Taiwan will likewise not see seismic change should Tsai succeed in her re-election bid, but the Anti-Infiltration Act that passed the legislature at the end of 2020 is set to become a fuse that sets off further tensions across the Taiwan Strait, Li added.

Nevertheless, former Mainland Affairs Council deputy minister and current Taiwanese Public Opinion Foundation (台灣民意教育基金會) Chairman You Ying-lung (游盈隆) believes Tsai could seek to build a legacy that gives her a prominent place in the history of the democracy, an approach often seen during the second term of an elected president.

Tsai may float the idea of meeting with Xi, for example, in a change of course that could reshape the future cross-strait relationship, the report cited You as saying.