US Department of State reacts to Taiwan’s Anti-Infiltration Act

Beijing condemns DPP for 'damaging Taiwanese citizens’ welfare,' US encourages more cross-strait communication

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Legislative Yuan passes Anti-Infiltration Act Dec. 31. 

Legislative Yuan passes Anti-Infiltration Act Dec. 31.  (CNA photo)

TAIPEI (Taiwan News) — In an email addressed to Taiwanese media, the U.S. Department of State expressed hope that Taiwan and China could reach a peaceful reconciliation despite the passage of the Anti-Infiltration Act.

On Tuesday (Dec. 31), the Legislative Yuan passed the third reading of the Anti-Infiltration Act, which aims to stop illegal campaign contributions and the spread of misinformation by foreign powers, particularly the Chinese Communist Party. The new law has created tension between the ruling Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) and the rival Kuomintang (KMT), with the latter protesting that it came too close to the January 11 presidential and legislative elections.

An unnamed spokesperson from the U.S. Department of State said Thursday (Jan. 2) that the stability of the Taiwan-China relationship is in the long-term interest of the U.S. and that constructive cross-strait dialogue should be arranged between the two countries. The spokesperson also said that the U.S. sincerely hopes the Taiwanese and Chinese governments can come to an agreement that is beneficial to both, reported UDN.

Stanley Kao (高碩泰), head of the Taipei Economic and Cultural Representative Office (TECRO) in Washington D.C., said Wednesday (Jan. 1) that the Anti-Infiltration Act has demonstrated the Taiwanese government's clear stance on cross-strait issues.

Zhu Fenglian (朱鳳蓮), spokeswoman for China's Taiwan Affairs Office, voiced Beijing's opinion during a media briefing, accusing the DPP of being fear-mongers and condemning the independence-leaning party for "sacrificing the welfare of Taiwanese citizens," reported Liberty Times.