Award-winning children's poet discusses role of imagination in writing

Lin Shi-ren talks about his writing process, children’s poetry, sources of inspiration in latest I-Fun Learning Celebrity Interview

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Lin Shi-ren (National Academy for Educational Research photo)

Lin Shi-ren (National Academy for Educational Research photo)

TAIPEI (Taiwan News) — Renowned children's literature author Lin Shi-ren (林世仁) was invited to be the guest of the latest episode of the I-Fun Learning website's Celebrity Interviews.

I-Fun Learning is part of the National Academy for Educational Research (NAER), which provides resources for teachers and students.

In this episode, Lin talked about his writing process, touching on his definition of children’s poetry and his sources of inspiration for writing. He also shared tips on how to improve one's creativity and imagination.

Lin was born in Kaohsiung City's Zuoying District. He has taught part-time at a college and been an associate editor for a publishing company. Currently, he is a professional writer with expertise in children’s literature. He has won many awards for his works.

Lin said that children’s poetry derives from seeing things that people have become used to with childlike innocence and a refreshed perspective, using the fewest sentences possible to present interesting images or touching emotions.

Lin advocated jotting down inspiration, which he thinks is a gift from God, saying that people never know when it will come along. He added that he is usually on alert so as to catch any inspiration from what he sees, hears, or thinks that he feels is wonderful.

He went on to say that he has three notebooks. One he takes with him to record what he sees and thinks on the go, and the other he leaves at his bedside for inspiration that comes at night.

Lin also advocated reading more, saying that writing is an output and reading is an input. “Let other people’s creativity stimulate our creativity, and let others’ imaginations and affections ignite ours," he said. “Therefore, we must do more reading.”

He recommended writing down feelings, be they about a meaningful trip or anything else worth remembering on paper and adding photos, drawings, a short poem, or a few sentences to record the experiences. “The more and longer you write, the more advanced your writing ability will become,” Lin added.


(National Academy for Educational Research photo)