Taiwan aquarium successfully restores rare jellyfish species

Distinctive purplish sea creature can now be seen at National Museum of Marine Biology and Aquarium in S. Taiwan

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Black sea nettle now on exhibition at NMMBA. (CNA photo)

Black sea nettle now on exhibition at NMMBA. (CNA photo)

TAIPEI (Taiwan News) — Taiwan's National Museum of Marine Biology and Aquarium (NMMBA) in Pingtung City has experienced a triumphant attempt at restoring the black sea nettle, a rare jellyfish species that can be sighted in Pacific waters.

As one of Taiwan's major contributors to animal conservation, the NMMBA has successfully restored many endangered species over the years, including corals, clownfish, and penguins. Hi-Scene World Enterprise Co., Taiwanese company in charge of NMMBA operations, said that while the black sea nettle is commonly known as black jellyfish, the color of its bell is actually reddish-purple and darkens with age, reported CNA.

According to Hi-Scene, the black sea nettle was not even listed as a species until 1997, largely due to its infrequent appearances near the water's surface. It added that the sea creatures are highly sensitive to water quality, so they are seldom seen near human activity.

According to Hi-Scene, the black sea nettle currently on display has a bright pink outer bell that resembles a giant peony and has mesmerized throngs of museum-goers. The company has also invited local and international visitors to register for NMMBA's sleepover experience, during which participants will have a chance to touch the jellyfish as well as understand its reproductive process, reported UDN.


Black sea nettle not frequently spotted near humans. (NMMBA photo)