UK parties attack rival spending plans in election feud

Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson visits the headquarters of Iceland Foods in Deeside, Wales, Friday Nov. 8, 2019. Johnson pushed hard for the ea...

Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson visits the headquarters of Iceland Foods in Deeside, Wales, Friday Nov. 8, 2019. Johnson pushed hard for the ea...

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn looks at the effects of flooding during a visit to Conisborough, South Yorkshire, England, Saturday, Nov. 9, 2019. British...

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn looks at the effects of flooding during a visit to Conisborough, South Yorkshire, England, Saturday, Nov. 9, 2019. British...

LONDON (AP) — Britain's biggest political parties are accusing each other of financial recklessness as they vie to win voters' trust on the economy ahead of Britain's Dec. 12 election.

The main opposition Labour Party accused the governing Conservatives on Sunday of spreading fake news with an eye-catching claim that Labour spending pledges will cost 1.2 trillion pounds ($1.5 trillion) over five years.

The figure is based on assuming a Labour government would implement every policy it has adopted in principle. Labour says not all those pledges will be in its official election platform.

Labour economy spokesman John McDonnell said the Conservative figure was "an incompetent mish-mash of debunked estimates and bad maths."

Treasury chief Sajid Javid stood by the estimate, saying Labour's proposals were "absolutely reckless."