Mysterious oil spill reaches Brazilian city of Salvador

In this Sept. 25, 2019 photo released by the Sergipe state Government, an oil spill covers a beach on Sergipe state, Brazil. The spill started landing

In this Sept. 25, 2019 photo released by the Sergipe state Government, an oil spill covers a beach on Sergipe state, Brazil. The spill started landing

CORRECTS DATE - In this Oct. 7, 2019 handout photo released by the Aracaju Municipal Press Office, workers remove oil from Viral Beach, in Aracaju, Br

CORRECTS DATE - In this Oct. 7, 2019 handout photo released by the Aracaju Municipal Press Office, workers remove oil from Viral Beach, in Aracaju, Br

This Oct. 4, 2019 handout photo released by the Aracaju Municipal Press Office, shows rocks stained by an oil spill, on Artistas Beach, in Aracaju, Br

This Oct. 4, 2019 handout photo released by the Aracaju Municipal Press Office, shows rocks stained by an oil spill, on Artistas Beach, in Aracaju, Br

In this Sept. 25, 2019 photo released by the Sergipe state Government, oil sludge floats near the rocks at the Coroa do Meio beach, in Sergipe state,

In this Sept. 25, 2019 photo released by the Sergipe state Government, oil sludge floats near the rocks at the Coroa do Meio beach, in Sergipe state,

In this Sept. 25, 2019 photo released by the Sergipe state Government, an oil spill covers a beach on Sergipe state, Brazil. The spill started landing

In this Sept. 25, 2019 photo released by the Sergipe state Government, an oil spill covers a beach on Sergipe state, Brazil. The spill started landing

RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — A mysterious oil spill that has polluted at least 150 beaches along Brazil's northeastern coast reached the city of Salvador on Friday as officials tried to determine the source of the crude sludge.

Authorities confirmed the oil had reached the Piata beach in Salvador, Brazil's fourth-largest city that's known for its beaches and Afro-Brazilian culture. Overall, 68 municipalities in nine states have been affected by the spill that began Sept. 2.

A report from Brazil's Institute of the Environment and Water Resources said the origin of the sludge has still not been determined, though environment minister Ricardo Salles earlier said it was likely the oil was of Venezuelan origin — something denied by Caracas. The main hypothesis is that the oil spilled from a vessel passing near the Brazilian coast.