Revelations in impeachment inquiry rattle State Department

United States Secretary of State Mike Pompeo speaks during a press conference with North Macedonia's Prime Minister Zoran Zaev in Lake Ohrid, southern

United States Secretary of State Mike Pompeo speaks during a press conference with North Macedonia's Prime Minister Zoran Zaev in Lake Ohrid, southern

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and his wife Susan arrive at the Athens Eleftherios Venizelos International Airport on Friday, Oct. 4, 2019. Pompe

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and his wife Susan arrive at the Athens Eleftherios Venizelos International Airport on Friday, Oct. 4, 2019. Pompe

WASHINGTON (AP) — The State Department has been deeply shaken by the rapidly escalating impeachment inquiry, as revelations that President Donald Trump enlisted diplomats to dig up dirt on a political rival threaten to tarnish its reputation as a nonpartisan arm of U.S. foreign policy.

Former diplomats say a department where morale was already low under a president who at times has seemed hostile to its mission is now reeling from days of disclosures. They fear that the turmoil will damage American foreign policy objectives around the world.

Heather Conley, a senior policy adviser at State under President George W. Bush, says: "You can just feel there is a sense of disbelief. They don't know who will be subpoenaed next."