In leaderless Hong Kong movement, Joshua Wong just 1 voice

FILE - In this Sept. 11, 2019, file photo, Hong Kong activist Joshua Wong addresses the media during a press conference in Berlin, Germany. Overseas,

FILE - In this Sept. 11, 2019, file photo, Hong Kong activist Joshua Wong addresses the media during a press conference in Berlin, Germany. Overseas,

FILE - In this June 28, 2017, file photo, pro-democracy activist Joshua Wong is detained by police officers after he climb up to a giant flower statue

FILE - In this June 28, 2017, file photo, pro-democracy activist Joshua Wong is detained by police officers after he climb up to a giant flower statue

FILE - In this Aug. 17, 2017, file photo, Hong Kong activist Joshua Wong is taken away in a prison bus leaving the high court after his sentencing in

FILE - In this Aug. 17, 2017, file photo, Hong Kong activist Joshua Wong is taken away in a prison bus leaving the high court after his sentencing in

FILE - In this Dec. 5, 2014, file, photo, student leader Joshua Wong attends a news conference as he sits on a wheel chair during a hunger strike at t

FILE - In this Dec. 5, 2014, file, photo, student leader Joshua Wong attends a news conference as he sits on a wheel chair during a hunger strike at t

FILE - In this Sept. 9, 2019, file photo, German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas, right, and Hong Kong activist Joshua Wong, left, shake hands during a re

FILE - In this Sept. 9, 2019, file photo, German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas, right, and Hong Kong activist Joshua Wong, left, shake hands during a re

HONG KONG (AP) — Overseas, Joshua Wong has emerged as a prominent face of Hong Kong's months-long protests for full democracy. At home, he is just another protester.

The activist known for leading democracy protests in 2014 will speak to the U.S. Congress on Tuesday after visiting Germany and Taiwan to drum up support.

While not diminishing the importance of his overseas role, other protesters say Wong does not speak for what is purposefully a leaderless movement. He is well-known but the movement is largely faceless, since many protesters speak only anonymously and wear masks to conceal their identities.

Wong is among five people due to speak to Congress to rally support for a bill proposing economic sanctions and penalties on Chinese and Hong Kong officials found to have suppressed democracy in the city.