Fijian leader urges Australia to do more on climate change

Australia's Prime Minister Scott Morrison, right, and Fiji's Prime Minister Voreqe Bainimarama walk through Parliament House after an official welcome

Australia's Prime Minister Scott Morrison, right, and Fiji's Prime Minister Voreqe Bainimarama walk through Parliament House after an official welcome

Australia's Prime Minister Scott Morrison, right, and Fiji's Prime Minister Voreqe Bainimarama pose for a photo after an official welcome ceremony at

Australia's Prime Minister Scott Morrison, right, and Fiji's Prime Minister Voreqe Bainimarama pose for a photo after an official welcome ceremony at

Fiji's Prime Minister Voreqe Bainimarama sits down to bilateral meetings with Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison at Parliament House in Canberra

Fiji's Prime Minister Voreqe Bainimarama sits down to bilateral meetings with Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison at Parliament House in Canberra

Australia's Prime Minister Scott Morrison, left, watches as Fiji's Prime Minister Voreqe Bainimarama signs the visitors book after an official welcome

Australia's Prime Minister Scott Morrison, left, watches as Fiji's Prime Minister Voreqe Bainimarama signs the visitors book after an official welcome

Fiji's Prime Minister Voreqe Bainimarama, center, inspects an honor guard outside Parliament House in Canberra, Australia, during his official welcome

Fiji's Prime Minister Voreqe Bainimarama, center, inspects an honor guard outside Parliament House in Canberra, Australia, during his official welcome

CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — Fiji's prime minister has used a state visit to urge Australia to take more ambitious actions to slash greenhouse gas emissions.

Voreqe Bainimarama said in a speech at the Australian Defense College on Monday that he hopes Fiji and Australia can "find more common ground" on climate change.

Fiji and other Pacific island nations are particularly vulnerable to climate change.

Bainimarama's visit comes as Australia's center-left opposition mulls abandoning its policy of reducing Australia's greenhouse gas emissions by 45% below 2005 levels by 2030.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison's conservative coalition won a surprise third term in May elections with a commitment to reduce emissions by 26% to 28% in the same time frame.

Bainimarama met Morrison at Parliament House on Monday.