As shock wears off, mental health concerns grow in Bahamas

Mos Antenor, 42, drives a bulldozer while clearing the road after Hurricane Dorian Mclean's Town, Grand Bahama, Bahamas, Friday Sept. 13, 2019. (AP Ph...
Porcelain figures rest among the remains of a shattered house at the aftermath of Hurricane Dorian in Freetown, Grand Bahama, Bahamas, Friday Sept. 13...
A shattered gas station is seen at the aftermath of Hurricane Dorian in Freetown, Grand Bahama, Bahamas, Friday Sept. 13, 2019. (AP Photo/Ramon Espino...

Mos Antenor, 42, drives a bulldozer while clearing the road after Hurricane Dorian Mclean's Town, Grand Bahama, Bahamas, Friday Sept. 13, 2019. (AP Ph...

Porcelain figures rest among the remains of a shattered house at the aftermath of Hurricane Dorian in Freetown, Grand Bahama, Bahamas, Friday Sept. 13...

A shattered gas station is seen at the aftermath of Hurricane Dorian in Freetown, Grand Bahama, Bahamas, Friday Sept. 13, 2019. (AP Photo/Ramon Espino...

HIGH ROCK, Grand Bahama (AP) — One woman and her husband huddled on top of a bedroom dresser for two days, surrounded by floodwaters.

Another man sat in his wheelchair for nearly 48 hours in water up to his chest.

A third rescued a friend who sat in shock when part of a building where they sought shelter blew away.

Stories of survival are trickling out across northern Bahamas as the initial shock wears off from Hurricane Dorian, one of the strongest Atlantic hurricanes in history.

But even as some Bahamians were still in survival mode, others were slowly beginning to understand the extent of the storm's devastation.

Pastor Robert Lockhart of Calvary Temple in Grand Bahama said: "I think some persons can't believe that it happened, and others are still processing it."