Veterans with PTSD, anxiety turn to beekeeping for relief

In this Aug. 7, 2019 photo, U.S. Army veteran Wendi Zimmermann uses a tool to slide up a frame of bees to check them for disease and food supply at th

In this Aug. 7, 2019 photo, U.S. Army veteran Wendi Zimmermann uses a tool to slide up a frame of bees to check them for disease and food supply at th

In this Aug. 7, 2019 photo, instructor Karen Eaton, left, supervises beekeeping activities performed by veterans at the Veterans Affairs' beehives in

In this Aug. 7, 2019 photo, instructor Karen Eaton, left, supervises beekeeping activities performed by veterans at the Veterans Affairs' beehives in

In this July 11, 2019 photo, Adam Ingrao, an agricultural entomologist and military veteran who runs the Heroes to Hives program, holds a bee at the H

In this July 11, 2019 photo, Adam Ingrao, an agricultural entomologist and military veteran who runs the Heroes to Hives program, holds a bee at the H

In this Aug. 7, 2019 photo, U.S. Army veteran Oscar Toce cleans up after beekeeping at the Veterans Affairs' beehives in Manchester, N.H. Veterans Aff

In this Aug. 7, 2019 photo, U.S. Army veteran Oscar Toce cleans up after beekeeping at the Veterans Affairs' beehives in Manchester, N.H. Veterans Aff

In this Aug. 7, 2019 photo, the queen bee (marked in green) and worker bees move around a hive at the Veterans Affairs in Manchester, N.H. Veterans in

In this Aug. 7, 2019 photo, the queen bee (marked in green) and worker bees move around a hive at the Veterans Affairs in Manchester, N.H. Veterans in

In this July 11, 2019 photo, Frank Bartel, a 69-year-old resident of Gregory, Mich., looks at some bees at the Henry Ford farm in Superior Township, M

In this July 11, 2019 photo, Frank Bartel, a 69-year-old resident of Gregory, Mich., looks at some bees at the Henry Ford farm in Superior Township, M

In this Aug. 7, 2019 photo, U.S. Army veterans Oscar Toce, left, and Wendi Zimmermann pack up after beekeeping activities at the Veterans Affairs' bee

In this Aug. 7, 2019 photo, U.S. Army veterans Oscar Toce, left, and Wendi Zimmermann pack up after beekeeping activities at the Veterans Affairs' bee

In this July 11, 2019 photo, a swarm of bees is seen at the Henry Ford farm in Superior Township, Mich. A beekeeping program, Heroes to Hives, taught

In this July 11, 2019 photo, a swarm of bees is seen at the Henry Ford farm in Superior Township, Mich. A beekeeping program, Heroes to Hives, taught

MANCHESTER, N.H. (AP) — A small but growing number of veterans around the country are turning to beekeeping as a potential treatment for anxiety, PTSD and other conditions.

Veterans Affairs has begun offering beekeeping at a few facilities including in New Hampshire and Michigan, and researchers are starting to study whether the practice has therapeutic benefits.

For now, there is little hard data, but veterans in programs like the one at the Manchester VA Medical Center in New Hampshire insist that beekeeping helps them focus, relax and become more productive.

While some programs are geared to helping veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder, others have a broader mandate. Their main goal is to expose veterans to beekeeping, and relief from PTSD or anxiety is an added benefit.