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Exiled Bangladeshi Muslim writer Taslima Nasrin seeks Indian citizenship

Exiled Bangladeshi Muslim writer Taslima Nasrin seeks Indian citizenship

Facing death threats from Islamic hard-liners at home, exiled Bangladeshi writer Taslima Nasrin reiterated a request Monday for Indian citizenship or permanent resident status.
Nasrin fled Bangladesh in 1994 when Islamic extremists threatened to kill her after an Indian newspaper quoted her as saying changes must be made to the Islamic holy book, the Quran, to give women more rights.
She has vehemently denied making the comments.
Nasrin's visa was extended six months ago by Indian authorities after a one-year resident permit expired. She has sought another visa extension, she said, but would prefer instead to become an Indian citizen.
"I would have liked to stay on in Bangladesh, but since I am not allowed to stay there right now, my second best choice is Calcutta," Nasrin said. "We speak the same language, I feel very comfortable here."
To flourish as a writer, Nasrin said she had to live with people who speak the Bengali language, which is spoken in Bangladesh and in India's neighboring West Bengal state, of which Calcutta is the capital.
After fleeing Bangladesh, Nasrin also lived in Sweden for several years but eventually returned to India, making Calcutta her home for the last two years.
"To live like a writer I cannot shift elsewhere. Here (in India) I can meet my own people, converse with them in my own language, the language for expressing my thoughts. The government can help me live as a writer," she told the Press Trust of India news agency on Sunday.
Indian officials were not immediately available for comment Monday.
In 2004, the Bangladesh government banned her Bengali-language book "Shei Shab Andhakar" _ or "Those Dark Days" _ published in West Bengal for what it said were objectionable comments about Islam and the Prophet Mohammad.


Updated : 2021-04-13 02:10 GMT+08:00