Hong Kong democracy activists visit Taiwan's political parties

Today Taiwan, tomorrow Hong Kong: Joshua Wong

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Hong Kong activists Lester Shum (from left to right), Eddie Chu and Joshua Wong visiting NPP Chairman Hsu Yung-ming and legislator Huang Kuo-chang.

Hong Kong activists Lester Shum (from left to right), Eddie Chu and Joshua Wong visiting NPP Chairman Hsu Yung-ming and legislator Huang Kuo-chang. (By Central News Agency)

TAIPEI (Taiwan News) – During his visits to the New Power Party (NPP) and the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) Tuesday (September 3), Hong Kong democracy activist Joshua Wong (黃之鋒) said he wanted more Taiwanese to mobilize in support of the semi-autonomous Chinese territory.

Demosisto Secretary-General Wong, Legislative Council member Eddie Chu (朱凱迪) and student activist Lester Shum (岑敖暉) arrived in Taiwan Tuesday for meetings with political parties and to take part in a symposium about democracy.

The first visit on their itinerary took them to the NPP, the party which grew out of the 2014 Sunflower student movement against a trade pact with China.

After a closed-door meeting with NPP Chairman Hsu Yung-ming (徐永明) and with legislator Huang Kuo-chang (黃國昌), Wong told reporters that with his visit, he was hoping to encourage friends in Taiwan to mobilize in order to oppose further repression in Hong Kong, the Central News Agency reported.

As the authorities were preparing to use emergency legislation and martial law to control education and transportation, and to oppress the people of Hong Kong, it was important for the people of Taiwan to stand together and rally in Hong Kong’s support, Wong said.

The student leader also expressed the hope that the government and Legislative Yuan could do their utmost to protect Hong Kong people living in Taiwan.

Using the phrase “today Taiwan, tomorrow Hong Kong,” Wong also said he hoped his home town could become as free and democratic a society as Taiwan. He also asked more Taiwanese to mobilize in favor of the territory before China’s National Day, October 1.

Chu said China could ban protests in Hong Kong, but it did not have the power to ban protests elsewhere, so it was important for Taiwanese to rise up in support.

Hsu replied that his NPP would present suggestions to the Legislative Yuan, including expressions of concern over the possible introduction of emergency legislation in Hong Kong.

Later in the afternoon, the three activists also visited the ruling DPP, where they repeated their call for more action in Taiwan before October 1. DPP officials said it was up to members of the public to launch plans for protests or other forms of action, but they added the party would support any such plans.