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MECO, DOLE set up manpower registry

Filipinos wearing colorful make-up and costumes participate at a religious festival in Taipei last Sunday. MECO and DOLE say they are building an onli...

Filipinos wearing colorful make-up and costumes participate at a religious festival in Taipei last Sunday. MECO and DOLE say they are building an onli...

Are you heading home soon?
If you are, make sure that you register with the Department of Labor and Employment's human resource database that helps market workers for possible jobs in the industrial zones of Subic and Clark, said Reynaldo Gopez, labor representative of the Manila Economic and Cultural Office in Taipei.
"Starting this month, DOLE and MECO have activated a National Manpower Registry (for returning migrants)," Gopez told Taiwan News.
"Of course, registration is voluntary, and there is no guarantee that you'd be recruited by employers and other industrial park locators the moment you sign up. If your name is in this database however, there's always this possibility that you'd get picked and hired."
Copies of the registration form are available at all MECO offices. Soon, it will also be distributed in areas frequented by Pinoys.
"We will be working closely with non-governmental organizations like the Hope Workers' Center in the distribution of these registration forms," Gopez said.
The DOLE-MECO project aims to build a talent pool comprising Filipinos who have worked at electronics companies and high-tech facilities in Taiwan.
"They have skills and experience, and those are the qualities that Clark and Subic investors - particularly electronics and value-added manufacturers - are looking for in their workforce," MECO Welfare Officer Cynthia Lamban added.
"Instead of building a workforce from scratch, those employers could use this manpower registry to expedite their search for and recruitment of skilled workers. Employers could pick the qualified applicants from this database, and later interview them to validate their credentials."
Job seekers are required to fill out the registration form to get their names into the online jobs and skills-matching registry. Applicants are required to list down skills and competencies acquired through training and work experiences, and professional licenses if any.
Late last year, Philippine Labor and Employment Secretary Arturo D. Brion already expressed his intent to build a manpower pool of former overseas Filipino workers in Taiwan for possible local jobs in Clark and Subic.
"Our workers' exemplary attitude and dedication to their craft have become our global trademark. It has not only propelled us to be one of the most preferred workers overseas but more significantly, it has enticed multinational companies to put up businesses (in the Philippines)," Brion said in a statement issued by DOLE.
The manpower pooling and the prospect of providing local jobs to former OFWs in Taiwan embody an essential component of the DOLE's reintegration program for OFWs and their families, he continued.
"It demonstrates too the 'brain gain' that we derive from overseas employment as these workers will use the experience they have secured from working in Taiwan," said the labor chief.
OFWs in Taiwan easily outnumber other foreign workers in the manufacturing sector, which includes industries such as telecommunications, electronics, audio-visual products, electronic spare parts and peripherals, and electrical manufacturing.
Taiwanese electronics manufacturers who are mulling over the possibility of setting up factories in Clark or Subic would find this national manpower registry helpful, Brion said.


Updated : 2021-06-16 17:17 GMT+08:00