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Sweden kicks off 300th anniversary celebrations for famed scientist Linnaeus

Sweden kicks off 300th anniversary celebrations for famed scientist Linnaeus

There are places on the moon named after him. He is depicted on Swedish bank notes. But Carl Linnaeus' real claim to fame is his system of classifying all living organisms that remains the international standard.
Sweden on Saturday kicked off yearlong celebrations marking the 300th anniversary of the birth of its most famous scientist.
"He has meant an incredible amount to the world because by systematizing just about every plant and animal, he helped organize it," said Kajsa Eriksson, spokeswoman for the Linnaeus 2007 celebration.
Often called the father of taxonomy, Linnaeus was one of the most significant scientists of his time. He laid the foundation for a new classification of plants and animals based on their reproductive systems.
It is thanks to him that humans are called Homo sapiens in the world of science and are classified as primates in the class of mammals, Mammalia.
By the time he was 30, he had written a number of the works that made him famous in the world of science, including Systema Naturae, which classified 4,400 species of animals and 7,700 species of plants when it reached its 10th edition in 1758.
His ideas have influenced generations of scientists, including Charles Darwin, and even those opposed to the philosophical and theological roots of his work.
Celebration started Saturday in Linnaeus' old primary school town in Vaxsjo, 440 kilometers (275 miles) south of Stockholm but the national inauguration will begin Sunday.
Coordinating the tercentenary work in Sweden is a National Linnaeus Commission of the government's Swedish Research Council. King Carl XVI Gustaf is patron of the tercentenary celebrations.
A modern Linnaeus garden designed by landscape architect Ulf Nordfjell and "The Linnaeus Expedition," a film by photographer Mattias Klum and Swedish journalist Folke Ryden, are among projects that will take place this year to honor Linnaeus.
"It's amazing that one person knew as much during the 18th century about how everything is connected," Klum said.
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On the Net:
http://www.linnaeus2007.se