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Chen undersocre resolve to promote Taiwan indentity

Chen undersocre resolve to promote Taiwan indentity

President Chen Shui-bian, while softening his rhetoric on Taiwan independence in the last years, told CNN he will strive to strengthen Taiwan identity during his remainder of office.
Chen, whose Democratic Progressive Party has made building a Taiwan republic its founding goal, asserted the island is an independent, sovereignty country though it has yet to achieve full statehood.
"If Taiwan were a normal country, it would be a member of the United Nations and a member of the World Health Organization,”Chen said, adding the lack of normal statehood is strengthened by the fact that the Constitution has yet to be approved by the people through a popular vote.
He reiterated the plan to write a new constitution that will meet Taiwan’s modern political needs. The claim that the country's territory and dominion extend to China and Outer Mongolia as stated in the Constitution is unrealistic and harmful to cross-strait peace.
Chen has pledged to introduce a new constitution through a referendum before his tenure expires in May 2008, an agenda that is seen by Beijing as his attempt to pursue de jure independence for Taiwan.
But Chen said his administration has sought to maintain the statue quo in the Taiwan Strait and defined the status quo as Taiwan and China existing peacefully on separate sides of the strait.
As head of the state, Chen said it is his primary responsibility to continue the pursuit of Taiwan-centric consciousness and much remains to be done in this area. He noted that in 2000, 36 percent of people branded themselves Taiwanese and the figure jumped to 60 percent at the end of last year.
"I hope by the time I finish my term of office, this number will increase to 70 percent or even 75 percent,”Chen said, attributing his reelection in 2004 to the fact the many people share his stance on Taiwan-centric consciousness.
He pointed out that in 2000, he won the presidency with 39.3 percent of the vote and the number hit over 50 percent in 2004.
However, Chen said he regretted some people in Taiwan refuse to recognize the trend or label themselves as Taiwanese.
"Some people continue to regard themselves as Chinese and believe Taiwan is part of China,” Chen said.“The phenomenon shows the government should try harder to promote Taiwan identity.” Chen did not elaborate on how his administration plans to to pursue the goal.


Updated : 2021-05-14 09:14 GMT+08:00