5 months on, Christchurch attacker inspires others

FILE - In this March 18, 2019, file photo, mourners lay flowers on a wall at the Botanical Gardens in Christchurch, New Zealand. The El Paso massacre

FILE - In this March 18, 2019, file photo, mourners lay flowers on a wall at the Botanical Gardens in Christchurch, New Zealand. The El Paso massacre

New Zealand's Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern talks to the media on Monday, Aug. 5, 2019, in Wellington, New Zealand. Ardern spoke about the El Paso mas

New Zealand's Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern talks to the media on Monday, Aug. 5, 2019, in Wellington, New Zealand. Ardern spoke about the El Paso mas

FILE - In this Aug. 4, 2019, file photo, Rene Aguilar and Jackie Flores pray at a makeshift memorial for the victims of Saturday's mass shooting at a

FILE - In this Aug. 4, 2019, file photo, Rene Aguilar and Jackie Flores pray at a makeshift memorial for the victims of Saturday's mass shooting at a

SYDNEY (AP) — The attack on a Texas Walmart that left 22 people dead bore all the classic hallmarks of America's cycle of mass shootings. A lone shooter. Multiple casualties. A white male accused of the crime.

But it also revealed a pattern of emerging white supremacy, and apparent inspiration by the New Zealand mosque attacks earlier this year.

The El Paso massacre is the latest attack in which the gunman appears to have praised the March shootings in Christchurch. That's the city where an Australian white supremacist is charged with killing 51 worshippers at two mosques.

Christchurch seems to be gaining ground as a political symbol, as the racist views espoused by the man charged with the killings resonate with white supremacists half a world away.