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Bridget Everett Tells Bawdy Tales

Bridget Everett Tells Bawdy Tales

Bridget Everett's bawdy burlesque act is enough to make even the foulest-mouthed sailor blush.
In the opening song of her self-described "trashy" off-Broadway show, "At Least It's Pink," she acknowledges being a dimwitted heavy drinker who once had sex with a minor in the back seat of her car. She then goes on to describe every one of her favorite sex acts in far too colorful language.
Everett, though, is not a one-note kind of gal. Her character, however loosely based on her true persona, is a humorous study in contradiction: She's got the native Kansan's rosy cheeks and overly trusting nature, but her life story is that of a vulgar nymphomaniac who desperately needs therapy.
With a voice that demands to be heard, Everett whips through numbers about reckless computer dating hookups, a pathetic high-school relationship with the captain of the tennis squad, a trip to the abortion clinic and her current job as a waitress at a midtown Manhattan restaurant.
A full-figured woman dressed in an impossibly tight corset, she delivers the best lines with such earnestness and perfect comic timing, her audience is at once appalled and doubled-over in laughter.
Everett has performed variations of the show at New York bars and clubs for years, but it has gotten a polished reworking under the direction of Michael Patrick King, the Emmy Award-winning director, writer and producer of "Sex and the City."
King has tightened the structure of the show, which flows smoothly from Everett's monologues and songs to her interactions with the audience, whom she appears to befriend as easily as a character with such low morals and self-respect would.
As she chats amiably with a woman in the audience about the prospect of being new girlfriends, she suddenly grows sullen, leans forward and says, "You ever get feeling down, Kat? Yeah, me, too. You know what helps me out of it? That's right ... Karaoke."
Backed by Kenny Mellman (one half of the stage act "Kiki and Herb") on piano, Everett then gets up and sings like a woman who has forgotten all her problems, or as she would put, is simply too wasted to remember them.
Aside from her stage presence and surprising gift for physical comedy, the show succeeds largely due to the lyrics and music, co-written by Everett and Mellman. Their love songs will hardly inspire a tear, but they do make you re-examine the oversentimentality of every other ballad ever composed.
"It'd be such a shame if we didn't share this special sexy time," Everett sings about one computer-dating encounter with a man named T-Bone. "All I know is there's a special sexy staircase we can climb."


Updated : 2021-08-04 06:49 GMT+08:00