Alexa

Roddick the comedian: Loser pokes fun at himself after crashing out of the Australian Open

Roddick the comedian: Loser pokes fun at himself after crashing out of the Australian Open

Andy Roddick was a bigger hit in his post-match news conference than he was on court against Roger Federer.
After a 6-4, 6-0, 6-2 drubbing from Federer in the semifinals of the Australian Open, Roddick delivered a stream of deadpan one-liners and jokes that revealed a wry sense of humor.
He was asked what it was like to be on center court at the end of a Grand Slam semi in which he was sent packing in straight sets in just 1 hour, 23 minutes.
"It was frustrating. It was miserable. It sucked. It was terrible," Roddick said. "Besides that, it was fine."
Roddick was asked to explain the match starting from the point where the score was 4-4 in the first set.
"I got broken. Then I got broken three more times. Then I got broken two more times in the third set. Then it was over 26 minutes later. Is that what you saw, too?" he said.
Questions turned to Jimmy Connors, the former great who is now coaching Roddick and who the player had earlier said helped to boost his game and his confidence to the point where he believed he was ready to challenge nine-time Grand Slam winner Federer.
Reporter: "What did Jimmy say to you straight after the game?"
Roddick: "He gave me a beer."
What was Connors advice coming into the match?
"There was a lot of strategy talk," Roddick said. But, "It's not so much like, `If you're down 6-4, 6-0, 2-0 ...' We didn't really talk about that. Oops."
How does he rate the chances of either Tommy Haas or Fernando Gonzalez _ the other semifinalists who play on Friday _ against Federer in the final?
"Slim."
At times, Roddick was clearly testy, and said in answer to a question that he would have paid "a lot of money" not to have to come to the press conference, noting that the fine for not appearing was US$20,000. He said he came because his father had taught him not to run away from tough situations.
But the main target of Roddick's wit was himself.
He said his daily habit of reading the sports pages would be tough on Friday because he would have to find a way to avoid reading about his match.
"I'm going to kind of have to like maneuver my way around it somehow. Get an oversized coffee mug, kind of like smoke and mirrors, or something."
By the end, Roddick appeared to be almost enjoying himself, and a reporter commented that his performance in the news conference was better than his performance on court.
"No (kidding)," Roddick said. "If there were rankings for press conferences, I wouldn't have to worry about dropping out of the top five."
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FEDERER'S LEGACY: Rod Laver has hailed Roger Federer as one of the greatest players in the game, if not the greatest, as the Swiss star closes in on Pete Sampras' career Grand Slam record of 14. Federer will reach 10 if he wins the Australian Open final on Sunday.
But Federer, who beat Andy Roddick in three easy sets Thursday to reach the Australian Open final, would be pleased if his legacy was that children looked up to him as a role model.
"I just hope I'm remembered as one of the good guys, fair, kind of an idol to kids, because that's what I needed to get started," Federer said. "I don't know what it takes to be remembered for all these things. This will only be answered once my career is over."
Federer said his life couldn't be better.
"I'm so happy the way things are going," said Federer. "I'm so proud of all my results and the way I kind of handled things. It's tough. But it's a great life, and I wouldn't exchange it for anything."
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FINAL GOODBYE: Belgian star Kim Clijsters, once Australia's favorite tennis daughter by association, left Rod Laver Arena on Thursday to a standing ovation after losing her Australian Open semifinal to Maria Sharapova.
Clijsters, who will retire at the end of 2007, became a crowd favorite after she was engaged to Australia's top player, Lleyton Hewitt. Even after she called the engagement off in October 2004 after a four-year relationship, Australian fans maintained a steadfast loyalty.
"It's been a pleasure playing here, a lot of fun," Clijsters told the 15,000 capacity crowd Thursday. "I'm sorry I couldn't come up with a better match today. I tried everything I had, and I came up against a better player."
The 24-year-old Clijsters said she will retire at the end of the year to start a family, tired of nagging injuries. She plans to marry Brian Lynch, an American who plays basketball in Belgium, in July or August after playing in her last Wimbledon.
"I will definitely come back," Clijsters told the crowd Thursday. "I don't just love to play tennis, I love to watch tennis. In a few years I'll be sitting in the stands, with maybe some kids. That's something I'm really looking forward to."
Sharapova praised Clijsters, who won the 2005 U.S. Open but also lost four Grand Slam finals.
"It's kind of sad," said Sharapova. "Kim's a great girl but also such a great champion on and off the court. She has got a lot ahead of her in her off-the-court life, and I think we all wish her the best."
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DUBIOUS DISTRACTIONS: Players in Rod Laver Arena have been buzzed by birds and bugs, serenaded in their native tongues and spurred to laughter in the middle of their service motions by fan quips over the last 11 days.
On Thursday, there was a new distraction: techno music from an outdoor concert alongside the nearby Yarra River. It wafted clearly into the stadium, where it nearly drowned out players' grunts and groans and seemed to get steadily louder.
"It was pretty loud," top-ranked Maria Sharapova said after her victory over Kim Clijsters. "You definitely hear it. Be pretty deaf not to."
Then there was the guy who didn't seem to know who was playing, shouting "Let's go Venus!" during both women's semifinals, referring to Venus Williams, who didn't even come to Australia this year due to injury.
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WATCH OUT: Australian Open organizers saw no glaring problem after a fan of Serena Williams was reportedly caught reflecting the glare off his watch into the eyes of Nicole Vaidisova during the semifinal.
The host broadcaster showed vision of a man, sitting in Williams' players box, moving his watch around at various times and reflecting the sun onto the court.
Nicole Vaidisova, who lost 7-6 (5), 6-4, said she didn't notice anything that would have distracted her from the match.
The issue was raised by respected television commentator John Barrett, who noted flashes of glare coming off the watch face of a man sitting in front of Williams' mother, Oracene.
"It is an extraordinary coincidence that whenever Vaidisova is serving, that youngster seems to be getting (the sunlight) into the eyes of Vaidisova," Barrett said.
Vaidisova was asked at a post-match news conference if she was affected by sun glare at any stage during the match.
"No, didn't notice anything," she said. "It was sunny, of course. But, no, not really crazy that I noticed."
Williams feigned laughter when asked to respond to the allegation, then frowned.
"That's the most outrageous thing I've ever heard," said Williams, a seven-time Grand Slam winner who is making a comeback from an injury-plagued 2006. "As if anyone would do that on purpose."
Despite media reports, Tennis Australia spokesman John Lindsay said officials had not asked for a copy of the television footage for review, and that there were no plans to investigate the incident.


Updated : 2021-02-28 09:38 GMT+08:00