Taipei Mayor Ko talks of corporate culture, digital governance

People’s trivial concerns should be treated as the government’s major priorities

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Taipei Mayor Ko talks of corporate culture, digital governance (Photo/Taiwan News)

Taipei Mayor Ko talks of corporate culture, digital governance (Photo/Taiwan News)

TAIPEI (Taiwan News) – Taipei Mayor Ko Wen-je (柯文哲) delivered a speech on the “corporate culture” of his administration and explored issues concerning digital governance at the I-Mei Foods building on May 20 at the invitation of the Digital Taiwan Roundtable (台灣數位科技與政策協進會).

Attendees of the seminar included Taipei’s Department of Information Technology Commissioner Lu Hsin-ke (呂新科), Department of Economic Development Commissioner Lin Chung-chieh (林崇傑), President of Digital Taiwan Roundtable Luis Ko (高志明), and city advisor Ben Jai (翟本喬).

Ko reiterated his political philosophy of “do the right thing,” while providing an environment that allows employees to “make mistakes,” so as to spur innovation without the fear of incurring penalties for failure.

The leader of Taiwan’s capital city laid out the key elements shaping the core values of the city government, which are integrity, openness, innovation, and teamwork. However, he joked, “teamwork lacking integrity amounts to complicity structure,” urging public servants not to fail people.

Echoing the remarks of the mayor, Luis Ko noted the event aimed to provide an opportunity for representatives from the government, industry, and academia to express their views freely and exchange opinions with the city officials. The occasion served as an example of how the public and private sectors can work together towards better governance.

Photo/Taiwan News

According to Ko, “people’s trivial concerns should be treated as the government’s major priorities.” Taipei City has been endeavoring to provide citizens with facilitated online application services.

Information Technology Commissioner Lu elaborated that the agency is striving to optimize the city’s identification systems incorporating residents’ information in various administrative areas. Pay.taipei, for example, is an online platform implemented to fast-track payment services spanning utility bills and parking tickets.

Lu also shared with the audience his vision of the city’s digital policies. With the introduction of enterprise architectures and project management methods, the city government seeks to create a cross-departmental information collaboration roadmap that incorporates 152 agencies and 682 information systems.

In the seminar, Information Management Association Hung Kuo-hsing (洪國興) offered his insight on the direction the country should be heading in digital governance. He proposed that Taiwan establish a national cloud center for better data integration and a common services platform allowing for improved resources integration.

Photo/Taiwan News