Winnie the Pooh roughs up the Formosan black bear outside the WHO

Representative office in Munich designed the cartoon to illustrate Taiwan's plight

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Winnie the Pooh roughs up a Formosan black bear outside the WHO (screenshot from facebook.com/TaiwaninMUC)

Winnie the Pooh roughs up a Formosan black bear outside the WHO (screenshot from facebook.com/TaiwaninMUC)

TAIPEI (Taiwan News) – A bear with a Winnie the Pooh mask is pushing a Formosan black bear away from a door marked “World Health Organization,” according to an illustration made by Taiwan’s representative office in the German city of Munich.

The image refers to the nickname for Chinese leader Xi Jinping (習近平), which has driven the communist authorities so far as to censor any references to or pictures of Winnie the Pooh from social media.

For the past three years, China has succeeded in blocking any invitation by the World Health Organization (WHO) for Taiwan to attend the annual World Health Assembly (WHA), scheduled for May 20-28 in Geneva this year.

In an effort to spread Taiwan’s message, the island’s office drew up the cartoon to accompany the message in Chinese, German and English on its Facebook page that it should be part of the WHO, the Central News Agency reported Saturday (May 11).

Under the title “A picture is worth a thousand words,” the office pleaded Taiwan’s case, without mentioning China by name.

“One country is blocking Taiwan’s participation as observer at the World Health Assembly. Thereby ignoring Taiwan’s 23 million people, who have a right to health like everyone else,” the Munich office wrote on its Facebook page.

It emphasized the need for Taiwan to help solve borderless infectious diseases. “Unfortunately, without Taiwan’s participation, there is a gap in the global health network which must be closed,” the office said, closing off with a call for support of the island nation’s bid to attend the WHA.

Several countries, including the United States, Japan, France and Germany, have publicly stated that Taiwan deserves to be included in the global health system.