UK's Theresa May seeks respite from Brexit walking in Wales

FILE - In this Thursday, April 11, 2019 file photo, British Prime Minister Theresa May speaks during a media conference at the conclusion of an EU sum

FILE - In this Thursday, April 11, 2019 file photo, British Prime Minister Theresa May speaks during a media conference at the conclusion of an EU sum

FILE - In this March 27, 2019, file photo, Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May leaves 10 Downing Street to attend her weekly Prime Minster's Question

FILE - In this March 27, 2019, file photo, Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May leaves 10 Downing Street to attend her weekly Prime Minster's Question

FILE - In this Nov. 24, 2018 file photo, British Prime Minister Theresa May, left, walks ahead of European Union chief Brexit negotiator Michel Barnie

FILE - In this Nov. 24, 2018 file photo, British Prime Minister Theresa May, left, walks ahead of European Union chief Brexit negotiator Michel Barnie

FILE - In this Friday, March 22, 2019 file photo, British Prime Minister Theresa May leaves after addressing a media conference at an EU summit in Bru

FILE - In this Friday, March 22, 2019 file photo, British Prime Minister Theresa May leaves after addressing a media conference at an EU summit in Bru

LONDON (AP) — British Prime Minister Theresa May is getting a respite from Brexit with a walking holiday in Wales.

The prime minister's Downing Street office says May and her husband, Philip, started a short vacation on Saturday.

Parliament is on an Easter break until April 23. Division in the House of Commons over Brexit brought months of bruising battles that didn't stop lawmakers from rejecting May's European Union divorce deal three times.

May enjoys hiking in the Welsh countryside. During a visit there in 2017, she infamously decided to call a snap election to strengthen her hand in Brexit negotiations. Instead, she lost her parliamentary majority and has struggled ever since to push through her EU withdrawal plans.

Asked Monday whether May is considering another election, spokesman James Slack said: "No."