Hong Kong novelist critical of China censored?

Broadcaster claims ‘technical errors’ prevented the scheduled interview from airing

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Ni Kuang talking to Paul Shieh Wing-tai SC, host of "Hong Kong Connection." (Screenshot from Hong Kong Connection)

Ni Kuang talking to Paul Shieh Wing-tai SC, host of "Hong Kong Connection." (Screenshot from Hong Kong Connection)

TAIPEI (Taiwan News) — An episode of Radio Television Hong Kong's docuseries "Hong Kong Connection" (時代的記錄 - 鏗鏘說) featuring the novelist Ni Kuang (倪匡) did not air as scheduled, raising suspicions of Chinese censorship.

The sci-fi novelist said in the interview that he thinks the “one country, two systems” policy is laughable. “’One Country, Two Systems’ are the words of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP). When is what the CCP says reliable? For decades, no promise has been realized by the CCP.”

In the interview, Ni spoke to host, Paul Shieh Wing-tai (石永泰), senior counsel and former chairperson of the Hong Kong Bar Association. Ni told him that when he first arrived in Hong Kong from Shanghai, in 1957, it was Hong Kong’s vibrant publishing industry that inspired him to write his first fiction “Buried Alive” (活埋).

Shieh quoted Ni’s words in the “Wisely Series,” “To destroy a city, there’s no need to demolish buildings, just take away its strong points.” He then asked Ni what he thought Hong Kong’s strong point was. “Freedom,” replied the novelist. “And the freedom of expression is the mother of all freedoms.”

Ni then insinuated that it was Chinese leader Xi Jinping’s (習近平) ambition to become an emperor. “He is already on the road to making himself an emperor. To consolidate his power, he has to implement total authoritarianism.”

The program was scheduled to broadcast during prime time at 7 p.m. on April 7 on Channel 31. Instead the broadcaster ran with a past episode featuring film director Felix Chong Man-Keung (莊文強), citing “technical errors,” reported Ming Pao and HK01.